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Friday, August 11
 

6:45am

Boehringer Ingelheim breakfast session
“Current concepts in managing canine oral health”
Presented by
Brook A. Niemiec DVM Diplomate, American Veterinary Dental College, Diplomate, European Veterinary Dental College Fellow, Academy of Veterinary Dentistry

Sponsors
avatar for Boehringher Ingelheim

Boehringher Ingelheim

Silver Sponsor
Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health business is the second largest company in the global animal health market, and is the top provider worldwide of parasiticides and vaccines for production animals and pets. Boehringer Ingelheim is committed to researching, developing and manufact... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 6:45am - 8:00am
Foyer E

8:15am

Respiratory examination and diagnostics
This session will focus on physical examination findings that provide localization of the source of respiratory dysfunction.  Appropriate use of respiratory techniques such as tracheal wash, bronchoscopy, and fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of respiration conditions will be illustrated using a case based approach.    

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central B/C

8:15am

Feline and canine tooth resorption
This session will review diagnosis and treatment of tooth resorption in dogs and cats. The importance of proper diagnosis using dental radiographs will be emphasized. Techniques for tooth extraction and crown amputation will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 5

8:15am

Major body system assessment in the small animal emergency patient
Emergency patients vary from completely stable (like a dog with a torn dew claw) to the almost dead (eg a dog with severe septic peritonitis). They may have conditions that are easy to diagnose like most cases of pyometra in an old, female, intact bitch with a purulent vaginal discharge. Or be very challenging, like a Cushingoid, diabetic with pancreatitis that presents for collapse. Because it is so challenging, it is vital to have a standardised approach so that you can rapidly determine the urgency of the problems. The approach needs to be automatic so that you instantly click into emergency assessment mode. Being able to rapidly determine how seriously affected an animal is goes a long way to countering the understandable stress that most of us feel when dealing with emergencies. And this lecture will show you how!

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central A

8:15am

The ethics of exotics
The ownership of exotic pets, in particular reptiles, is increasing within Australia and globally, but the welfare may be questionable due to poor husbandry. According to different studies, the mortality rate of pet reptiles in the UK is between 3.6 per cent(Robinson et al., 2015) and 75 per cent within the first year(Toland et al., 2012) – a spectacular range with both findings vigorously challenged by reptile enthusiasts and those opposed to the captive reptile trade.
In this talk I will present ethical frameworks for veterinarians to assess the treatment of reptiles by owners and veterinarians. I will also discuss ethical dilemmas that unusual and exotics veterinarians may encounter, and apply principles for ethical decision making.

Speakers
avatar for Anne Fawcett

Anne Fawcett

I am an associate at Sydney Animal Hospitals Inner West and I have a strong interest in animal welfare, ethics, companion animal medicine and surgery, infectious diseases, veterinary public health, veterinary wellbeing and mental health and lots of other stuff. I am also a lectur... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 9

8:15am

Rational approach to the vomiting dog and cat
This case-based presentation will provide a comprehensive overview of the vomiting reflex and the rational selection of anti-emetics for dogs and cats, with an emphasis on when to implement anti-emetic therapy and how to maximize anti-emetic therapy.  The indications and implementation of acid-suppressant therapy and optimization of dietary therapy using elimination diets or fat-restricted diets will also be emphasized. 

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Arena 1

8:15am

Do dogs have strokes? Cerebrovascular disorders
A cerebrovascular disorder may be defined as any abnormality of the brain that results from a pathological process compromising its blood supply.
Pathological processes of the blood vessel include occlusion of the lumen by a thrombus or embolus, rupture of the blood vessel wall, lesion or altered permeability of the vessel wall, and increased viscosity (or other changes) in the quality of the blood.
Cerebrovascular accident or CVA (also known as "stroke") is the most common clinical presentation of cerebrovascular disease in dogs, and is defined as a sudden onset of non-convulsive and non-progressive focal brain signs secondary to cerebrovascular disease.  By convention, these clinical signs must remain for more than 24 hours to qualify for a diagnosis of CVA, which usually is associated with permanent brain damage.
Should the clinical signs resolve within 24 hours, the episode is called a transient ischaemic attack or TIA.
This lecture will summarise the Causes and Pathophysiology of "stroke" in dogs.  Emphasis will be on Clinical Signs, Diagnosis, and Treatment, of these commonly occuring conditions.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 5

8:15am

Treating cancer in pet animals: The 'one cancer' concept
My wife and I currently have three dogs.  Like for many couples, families and individuals, pets are integrated into the daily routine and they play an important role in people's lives in general. I have learned from all my dogs over the years.  They teach by example – none are more loyal, better friends or more giving and selfless.
Besides life skills, our pets can also teach us about diseases and not just animal diseases.  There are many similarities between our patients and human patients in many fields of medicine.  Cancer is a prime example.  Comparative oncology research is reaching new heights annually on a global scale.  In Australia, we too can enrol in this exciting work, learn from our pets and help animals as well as people.
My colleague, Prof Nicole Ehrhart from Colorado State University recently wrote, “Research in this field, involving veterinarians, physicians, cancer specialists and basic scientists, is leading to improved human health and more rapid access to effective cancer treatment than has been previously possible through traditional cancer research approaches.”
In this session, I will talk about the role of Australian researchers and veterinarians in the One Cancer Concept.  Be part of the cure.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 7

8:15am

What is current in wound management and wound reconstruction in small animals?
The good news is that, in respect of wound management, if you keep doing what you were doing, you will keep getting what you always got.  If you are already skilled at the techniques you are practicing you will continue to get good results.  There are some new technologies that might afford you some "marginal" gains in wound management and some novel solutions to old problems but you cannot afford to ignore the basic principles and there is no substitute for a good understanding of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the processes you are hoping to influence.  This session will reinforce the basics and illustrate the potential advantages of some of the more recent developments.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Friday August 11, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 6

9:10am

Changing views on treatment of preclinical mitral valve disease in dogs
The results of the recently published EPIC (evaluation of pimobendan in cardiomegaly) trial will be discussed, which might change our treatment recommendations in stage B2 of the disease.

Speakers
avatar for Niek Beijerink

Niek Beijerink

Associate Professor, University of Sydney
Niek Beijerink is Associate Professor at the School of Veterinary Science, Sydney University, where he works since 2011. He is a European board certified (ECVIM) specialist in veterinary cardiology. Research: His main research interests are on genetics, pathophysiology and treatment of mitral valve disease and heart failure in dogs. Other research projects are on CT angiography of congenital heart disease, pathology of mitral valve disease, genetics of ventricular septal defects in horses, and the pathogenesis of short QT-syndrome in kangaroos. He is one of the authors of the Chapter on... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central B/C

9:10am

Feline gingivo-stomatitis: Diagnosis and treatment options
This presentation will summarize current information about this frustrating oral syndrome. Medical and surgical treatment options will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 5

9:10am

Environmental emergencies: The potentially lethal effects of the elements of the environment and how to manage them in dogs and cats
The most acutely lethal of the elements, fire, can cause smoke inhalation, carbon monoxide poisoning, and thermal burns; hypoxia from CO poisoning is presumably the most common cause of acute death. The most severe respiratory complications occur if the animal is close enough to the flames to also sustain burn injuries. Treatment includes oxygen supplementation, IV fluids, pain management, specific treatment of known inhaled toxins, and systemic and local therapy for dermal burns. Burns will be classified and a blueprint will be developed for management of dermal burns and the multiple sequelae that ensue.                                                                                                                       
In dogs, over 70% of total body heat loss is dissipated through radiation & convection from the body surfaces (peripheral vasodilation). Evaporation essentially via panting becomes important in maintaining normothermia as the environmental temperature rises to close to body temperature. There is a large surface area for water loss from the moist membranes of the nasal turbinates and are essential in evaporative cooling; hypersalivation improves this evaporation efficiency. High humid environments (>35%) reduce evaporative efficiency, and when humidity is >80%, evaporation is effectively negated. Seeking cooler locations aids heat dissipating mechanisms – warm blood at the periphery loses some heat as the body lies on a cool surface. Core body temperature rises when heat dissipating mechanisms become overwhelmed and non-pyrogenic hyperthermia occurs.           
Near drowning is a catastrophe of the water element – both wet drowning (aspiration of the water) and dry drowning (laryngospasm prevents fluid aspiration) result in the same hypoxaemic &  hypercarbic state. It is important to note that the initial difference between saltwater & freshwater drowning seems to be of little clinical difference, although aspiration of seawater characteristically leads to more hypoxaemia than aspiration of an equal volume of freshwater. Hypothermia is defined as a core body temperature of less than 35’C & can lead to severe derangements of the vital systems.                                                                                                                                                                                Primary Hypothermia occurs as a result of exposure to low environmental temperatures; some causes of secondary hypothermia include anaesthesia and surgery. Potential complications include CNS disturbances, CV & respiratory depression, acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, coagulopathy. Aggressive rewarming and prudent volume resuscitation are vital therapy measures but the clinician needs to anticipate hurdles to recovery

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central A

9:10am

Desexing of small mammals: A practical approach
Are you unsure of your skills when presented with a small mammal for desexing? This presentation will provide guidelines on how to desex commonly encountered small mammals, including rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets, rats and mice. Emphasis will be on practical skills, hints and tips to ensure your next small mammal desexing is successful - and stress free!

Speakers
avatar for Brendan Carmel

Brendan Carmel

UPAV Rep, FASAVA Committee, FASAVA C.O.C.
Dr Carmel works in a small animal practice in the northeast suburbs of Melbourne where over 90% of the caseload are unusual pets. He is the co-founder and current president of the Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians special interest group of the AVA; the President of the Unusual... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 9

9:10am

Oesophageal disease: The forgotten organ
This session will cover common but often misdiagnosed oesophageal disorders including oesophageal motility and inflammatory disorders with emphasis on gastric-oesophageal reflux.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Arena 1

9:10am

Motor unit disease: Polyneuropathies and junctionopathies
Generalised weakness (tetraparesis) may be seen with diseases causing dysfunction of multiple peripheral motor nerves (polyneuropathy) and these diseases are frequently referred to as lower motor neuron (LMN) disease.  The clinical signs of polyneuropathy are indistinguishable from conditions primarily affecting the neuromuscular junction (junctionopathy) and often muscle (polymyopathy) and collectively these conditions are better termed motor unit disease.   
Peripheral neuropathies may result from disease processes affecting the motor neuronal cell bodies within the spinal cord, the spinal nerve roots, axons or terminal processes and may be acute in onset or more slowly progressive.  Clinically animals may present with weakness, a reduction or loss of muscle tone, decreased or absent spinal reflexes and early onset muscle atrophy. Cranial nerve involvement may be evident and facial muscle weakness, dysphagia, laryngeal paresis or obstruction and megaoesophagus are often seen.  
The causes of generalised peripheral neuropathy and junctionopathy are many and include toxicities, metabolic disturbances, immune mediated, degenerative and genetic causes. Early recognition and treatment is important and life saving for many. Time and nursing is required for others ,where recovery is likely, but may not occur for months and  other causes may be progressive despite any treatment.
The clinical presentation, approach to investigation and a discussion of the causes and treatment of polyneuropathies and junctionopathies will be discussed using case examples. 

Speakers
avatar for Georgina Child

Georgina Child

Georgina is a graduate of University of Sydney (1980) and completed a residency in neurology at the University of California Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in 1985. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in Neurology. She has consul... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 5

9:10am

Treatment of mammary cancer in dogs
Mammary tumours are one of the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs and approximately half of the tumours are malignant. Despite prognostic factors being well described, the best, most appropriate treatments beyond surgery are still uncertain. In human patients with breast cancer the beneficial effect of chemotherapy on survival times is well described; however, few similar studies exist in dogs. This session will explore the prognostic factors for dogs with mammary carcinomas, and evaluate the most recent studies regarding the benefit or otherwise for chemotherapy.   

Speakers
avatar for Tony Moore

Tony Moore

Co-Director, Veterinary Oncology Consultants
Antony Stewart Moore BVSc, MVScDiplomate - ACVIM (Oncology)Member of the Australia and New Zealand College of Veterinary ScientistsRegistered Specialist in Veterinary Oncology in NSW, AustraliaTony received his veterinary degree in 1981, and a master’s degree in feline haematol... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 7

9:10am

Urinary tract surgery: From dribbly bums to blocked bladders
This session will look at common lower urinary tract conditions and diseases. It will include tips on the diagnosis of urinary incontinence and some of the newer techniques used to mange these at times challenging conidions. The lecture will also touch on managment of urethral obstructions secondary to urolithiasis and techniques to avoid urethral surgery. The lecture will also look at ways surgery can help manage recurrent lower urinary tract infections in dogs. Yes you medicine folk, surgery is sometimes the answer.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Marchevsky

Andrew Marchevsky

Small Animal Specialist Hospital
Andrew is a 1988 Sydney University graduate who did his specialist surgical training at Melbourne and Murdoch Universities during the 90s. A surgical specialist since 1999, he has a wealth of experience in soft tissue, neurological and orthopaedic surgery with, when push comes t... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 6

10:00am

Morning tea
Friday August 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:40am
Exhibition Hall

10:40am

Congress opening ceremony
Friday August 11, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Arena 1

11:35am

Management of incidental heart murmurs in cats
The management of incidental heart murmurs in cats will be discussed, using signalment profiling with 3 case examples (kitten, young adult cat, geriatric cat). 

Speakers
avatar for Niek Beijerink

Niek Beijerink

Associate Professor, University of Sydney
Niek Beijerink is Associate Professor at the School of Veterinary Science, Sydney University, where he works since 2011. He is a European board certified (ECVIM) specialist in veterinary cardiology. Research: His main research interests are on genetics, pathophysiology and treatment of mitral valve disease and heart failure in dogs. Other research projects are on CT angiography of congenital heart disease, pathology of mitral valve disease, genetics of ventricular septal defects in horses, and the pathogenesis of short QT-syndrome in kangaroos. He is one of the authors of the Chapter on... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central B/C

11:35am

To extract or not to extract
This session will review the non extraction options for periodontal disease, malocclusions and endodontic disease.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 5

11:35am

Helpful hints in small animal emergencies: A plethora of tips and guidelines to aid decisions on the run
This pot-pourris explores a selection of insights or retrospective clear-sightedness of situations encountered in small animal practice, with emphasis of the emergency/critical patient that presents acutely and demands immediate attention.                                                                                                                       
The ten golden rules of emergency medicine explain it all and using them empowers the emergency clinician in avoiding mistakes in management. Adherence to the Rule of 20 for in-hospital care of the critical patient has been proven to markedly improves outcomes.                                                                                                                 
Common pitfalls to avoid with routine procedures and routine veterinary medications will be highlighted, with scientific evidence emerging to explain some catastrophes that have been previously baffling.                                                                                                         
Clinical considerations not to be forgotten for certain symptoms and presentations avoid embarrassment later – it’s never happened to me, only to a friend of a friend!                                              
The treatment and differentiation of hypoglycaemia deserves special rumination and there are situations where we can enhance the effect of glucose therapy.                                
Post-trauma complications often don’t become evident for 24 or more hours. Monitoring these patients can be a challenge; the judicial use of old modalities like radiography and newer techniques such as FAST scans with ultrasound enhance sound management – “you see only what you look for; you recognise only what you know"                                                                                                                             Practical interpretation of an ECG tracing can guide therapy in the tachycardic critical patient and will feature in this collection.                                                                                                                                      Pointers in demarking abdominal effusions – haemorrhage, septic effusions, uroperitoneum, bile peritonitis to name some – will complete this erudition.

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central A

11:35am

Reptile anaesthesia: Cardiorespiratory anatomy, physiology and clinical management
A summary of the anatomy and physiology of the reptile cardiorespiratory system and how this impacts our ability to manage anaesthesia effectively in practice.

Speakers
avatar for Tegan Stephens

Tegan Stephens

UPAV Committee, Bird & Exotics Veterinarian Green Square
Dr Tegan Stephens graduated in 2009 from Sydney University and has worked since this time at the Bird & Exotics Veterinarian in Waterloo NSW. | She is now a senior exotics veterinarian following successful completion of her Unusual and Exotic Pet membership exams through the AN... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 9

11:35am

The chronic vomiting cat
Chronic vomiting in cats is a common complaint.  A simplified approach to vomiting will be presented covering dietary, infectious and inflammatory conditions responsible for vomiting.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Arena 1

11:35am

Motor unit disease: Myopathies, the oft forgotten and misdiagnosed
Diseases of skeletal muscle  are uncommon in  dogs and cats but the clinical signs are often incorrectly attributed to an orthopaedic, spinal  cord or peripheral nerve abnormality and myopathy is often overlooked in the workup of animals with exercise intolerance, weakness, stiffness, lameness, pain  or  muscle atrophy.  The clinical signs seen may be nonspecific and episodic in presentation.  Generalised myopathies usually present clinically as muscle weakness and exercise intolerance.  Animals may have difficulty getting up and sit or lie down quickly on exertion. Muscle strength may return with rest and clinically myopathies can be very difficult to distinguish from junctionpathies and polyneuropathies and, in some cases, polyarthropathy. Some animals show a stiff stilted or bunny hopping gait. Muscle tone may be increased rather than decreased. Muscle mass may be reduced or may, in some diseases, be increased.  An abnormal gait or posture may  be seen associated with muscle contractures.  Conditions causing rhabdomyolysis may result in swollen painful muscles, “cramping” weakness or acute collapse.
Muscle diseases may be due to genetic, metabolic, infectious or immune mediated disorders and may  be confined to one muscle or muscle group, for example masticatory muscle myositis, or may be generalised.
Clinical presentation, approach to investigation and a discussion of the causes and treatment of muscle diseases will be discussed using case examples. 

Speakers
avatar for Georgina Child

Georgina Child

Georgina is a graduate of University of Sydney (1980) and completed a residency in neurology at the University of California Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in 1985. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in Neurology. She has consul... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 5

11:35am

Canine lymphoma: New perspectives on treatment
Lymphoma is one of the most common cancers seen in dogs in clinical veterinary practice, and a plethora of information exists as to the prognostic factors; but when evaluating dogs with this disease, what emphasis should you place on staging, cytopathology or histopathology, lymphoma grade and immunotyping? Do the results make any difference at all to how you treat these patients? They should! This session will discuss the best approaches to patients with lymphoma, and how the results of your tests can guide treatment of the most commonly seen; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as less common entities including indolent lymphomas and T-cell lymphoma.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Moore

Tony Moore

Co-Director, Veterinary Oncology Consultants
Antony Stewart Moore BVSc, MVScDiplomate - ACVIM (Oncology)Member of the Australia and New Zealand College of Veterinary ScientistsRegistered Specialist in Veterinary Oncology in NSW, AustraliaTony received his veterinary degree in 1981, and a master’s degree in feline haematol... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 7

11:35am

Which liver lobe is that? The dos and don'ts of hepatobiliary surgery
Liver surgery can be complex, difficult and fraught with the potential for life threatening complications- Scared you off?  Well there certainly are some liver surgeries best left to specialists (you do not want to be launching into a large right sided liver tumour.) There are however certain techniques that can help your patients. Knowing your anatomy is important, so there will be a bit on that, before discussing meaningful liver biopsies (ie get enough so the pathologist won't start with "this small fragment of liver with crush artefact......."!), safe liver resections ( ie which lobes and how), hepatobiliary bypass (permanent and temporary) and cholecystectomy.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Marchevsky

Andrew Marchevsky

Small Animal Specialist Hospital
Andrew is a 1988 Sydney University graduate who did his specialist surgical training at Melbourne and Murdoch Universities during the 90s. A surgical specialist since 1999, he has a wealth of experience in soft tissue, neurological and orthopaedic surgery with, when push comes t... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 6

12:25pm

Lunch
Friday August 11, 2017 12:25pm - 1:25pm
Exhibition Hall

1:25pm

Canine nasal disease
Nasal discharge and sneezing are common signs of upper respiratory disease associated with infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases in dogs.  Signs are often chronic and physical examination abnormalities are minimal.  The most common causes of clinical signs will be reviewed including nasal aspergillosis, lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis, and neoplasia.  Efficient diagnostic methods and treatment options will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central B/C

1:25pm

Surgical extractions
This session will cover the equipment needed to perform surgical extractions in dogs and cats using still and video photography. Anesthetic management and administration of local anesthesia will be reviewed.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:25pm

Getting the most from your cardiovascular and respiratory assessment
Excellent observational and clinical examination skills give you some great pointers as to what the underlying problem might be. How do we assess the intravascular volume status of an animal using just the cardiovascular physical exam findings? How do we differentiate between a patient with hypovolaemic shock vs. cardiogenic vs. obstructive vs. SIRS/septic shock? What’s the best way to assess an animal with respiratory distress to idenitfy the underlying cause? What does it mean when the abdomen goes in when an animal inspires instead of out? This talk will explain!

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central A

1:25pm

Chlamydia testing in pet birds
Using data from over 4000 samples collected in a 10 year longitudinal study, this talk will cover the diagnostic, therapeutic and public health dilemmas of avian chlamydiosis.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Rosenwax

Alex Rosenwax

Alex undertook his veterinary studies with the specific aim of working with birds, reptiles, and exotic small mammals. This desire stems from an early childhood love for and fascination with birds and exotics. After graduating from Veterinary Science in 1991, Alex worked with birds, rabbits and fish in England, Hong Kong and Australia. He successfully completed the Membership Exams for the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists in Avian Health in January 1996. Alex established an all-bird and exotics veterinary service in Sydney in November 1996, the now 3 veterinarian purpose built clinic in Waterloo sees cases from other vets as well as those from pet owners. He is dedicated to providing quality care and treatment for all birds, reptiles, fish and small exotic mammals. Two large... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 9

1:25pm

Roadmap to chronic refractory diarrhea in dogs and cats
Chronic refractory diarrhea is one of the most common and frustrating maladies facing general practitioners today. These cases require a rational approach that incorporates the patient's signalment, history, physical examination findings, and a keen awareness of the limitations and benefits of diagnostic tests and procedures for patients with GI disease. This case-based presentation will highlight the critical review of laboratory tests, including the incorporation of PCR-based fecal testing, diagnostic imaging, and interpretation of GI biopsies. Management strategies including dietary therapy, immunotherapy, antimicrobial therapy, and probiotic therapy will also be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Arena 1

1:25pm

Seizures and epilepsy I: Diagnostic approach
Seizure disorders occur frequently in dogs and cats. Estimates of seizure incidence during a lifetime vary from 0.5% to 5.7% of all dogs, and from 0.5% to 1.0% of all cats. Discussion of seizure disorders of all types must precede consideration of the clinical management of epilepsy. Such a broad approach is necessary because dogs and cats with a seizure disorder frequently have similar histories and clinical signs despite a wide variety of underlying causes of cerebral dysfunction (including epilepsy). Similarities in clinical histories of dogs or cats with a seizure disorder reflect the similar pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie seizure disorders of all types.

This lecture will include a discussion of the Definitions of Terms used in the discussion of seizures and epilepsy, the Classification of Seizures, the Causes of Seizures, and the Diagnostic Approach to an animal with a Seizure Disorder.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:25pm

Treating cancer in pets: The diagnosis and surgical oncology
Surgery cures more cancer than any other single modality.  It is recognised in our counterpart human hospital settings that patient survival and quality of life outcome is greatly improved if a surgeon with specialised training in oncological procedures performs the surgery.  Veterinary training programs in surgical oncology have been in existence since 1986.  The discipline of surgical oncology is now recognised in veterinary medicine as a subspecialty by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. Surgical oncologists play an important role in veterinary and collaborative research, education, and training. The Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology has been developed to highlight the role and value of trained surgical oncologists in treating animals with cancer, to coordinate and conduct clinical research trials to advance our knowledge and treatment of cancer, and to provide continuing education opportunities for referring veterinarians, general surgeons, and surgical oncologists.
The veterinary surgical oncologist requires knowledge of tumour biology, imaging techniques, and other treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy.  Intensive training and experience have produced veterinary surgeons capable of providing great outcomes for animal cancer patients.  None of these improvements would have been possible if it were not for the recent great strides made in modern veterinary anaesthesia, imaging, analgesia, critical care, antibiotics, transfusion technology, surgical and critical care instrumentation.  Most importantly, a dedicated team is paramount to glorious outcomes.
I will give you five questions to ask yourself before attempting a surgical treatment for cancer.  The answers will allow you to be the best advocate for your cancer patients and provide the best outcomes for them.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 7

1:25pm

Developments in understanding of congenital portosystemic shunt disease and its treatment in dogs
What is the best way to manage portosystemic shunts in dog?  Surely by now, we should have worked this out!  Well, ...... actually, we havent but we understand quite a bit more than we did 20 years ago.  Currently, we are still identifying the unknowns so that we can add them to list of "known unknowns" that will be the subject of future study.  Advances in diagnostic imaging have led to much better three dimensional understanding of where shunts are and this has led to a revision of anatomical shunt nomenclature.  The best method of attenuation is still "up for grabs" with no single intravascular or extravascular technique having proven superiority in the short or long-term.  The development of multiple acquired shunts can happen with any of the techniques and none of the techniques or protocols used protect the dogs from post operative neurological disease.  The "unknown unknowns" are, therefore, still lurking in the shadows and whilst surgical treatment for dogs with CPSS remains the best therapy, it is by no means a 100% guaranteed outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Friday August 11, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 6

2:20pm

Approach to stridor and stertor
Abnormal respiratory noises that can be heard without a stethoscope include stertor and stridor.  Stridor is a high pitched inspiratory noise associated with obstruction of a large and rigid airway such as the larynx, trachea, or nasopharynx.  With severe obstruction, expiratory stridor can also be deteted.  Stertor is an inspiratory or expiratory snoring noise caused by vibration of soft tissues such as the soft palate and laryngeal saccules.  These findings help localize the type of disease and determine appopriate diagnostics and prognosis.    

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central B/C

2:20pm

Diagnosing and staging oral tumours in an orderly fashion
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 5

2:20pm

Emergency approach to the acute abdomen
Diagnosis and successful treatment of the patient with an acute abdomen is one of the greatest challenges in emergency and critical care. A meticulous and insightful physical examination, aggressive patient stabilization, rapid diagnosis and expedient identification of the surgical candidate are vital to ensure the best survival rates.

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central A

2:20pm

When the CAT meets unusual and avian pets: Computerized tomography as a diagnostic tool
This presentation will discuss the use of computerized axial tomography scans as a useful diagnostic tool for unusual/avian pets.

Speakers
avatar for Shangzhe Xie

Shangzhe Xie

Exotic Pets Referral Veterinarian/Surgical Coordinating Veterinarian, Adelaide Veterinary Specialist and Referral Centre
Shangz graduated from Murdoch University and has worked in Australia, New Zealand, USA and Singapore in a variety of practices including exotics-only, small animal (private, corporate and university-owned), emergency (corporate and university-owned) and specialist/referral practi... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 9

2:20pm

What’s the latest on canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis?
Canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis is a relatively common and frustrating syndrome that can be caused by a variety of infectious and non-infectious disorders. This case-based presentation will highlight a handful of clinical cases caused by different infectious agents with an emphasis on the diagnostic approach to hemorrhagic gastroenteritis, interpretation of fecal diarrhea panels, and the judicious implementation of antimicrobial therapy. Most affected dogs should not be managed with antimicrobials and the pros and cons for implementing antimicrobial therapy will also be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Arena 1

2:20pm

Seizures and epilepsy II: Treatment and management update
Appropriate therapy for a seizure disorder depends on accurate determination of the cause of the seizures. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (or AEDs) is indicated for animals with idiopathic epilepsy. Seizures resulting from a structural brain disorder (progressive intracranial disease) require additional therapy, depending on the cause of the disease (e.g., neoplasia or inflammation). AEDs usually are contraindicated for use in animals with extracranial causes of seizures, where therapy should be directed towards the primary cause of the seizures (e.g., hypoglycemia).
The efficacy of an AED depends on its serum concentration, because this determines its concentration in the brain. Therapeutic success can be achieved only when serum concentrations of a given AED are consistently maintained within a therapeutic range.  Therefore, AEDs that are eliminated slowly must be employed. The elimination half-lives of the various AEDs differ considerably between species. Few of the AEDs used for the treatment of epilepsy in people are suitable for use in dogs and cats. This is largely because of differences in pharmacokinetics of AEDs in animals and in humans. Some AEDs are metabolized so rapidly that it is not possible to reach consistently high serum concentrations, even with very high doses. For many AEDs, pharmacokinetic data and/or clinical experience are lacking in cats, a species that usually metabolize AEDs more slowly than dogs.
This lecture will review, contrast, and compare, the current AEDs available for use in cats and dogs.  Recommendations for epilepsy management will be discussed.  An approach to the management of status epilepticus will be included.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 5

2:20pm

Treating cancer in pets: Medical and radiation oncology from a surgeon’s perspective
What tumours are best treated with chemotherapy and which ones can be cured with radiation?  What are the side effects and how can these side effects be minimised, managed or even justified when treating animals with cancer?  How much do treatments cost and what do I tell the owners of my patients when considering these treatment options. There is a fog surrounding the answers to these questions in the minds of many of us.  Let us look at all these issues.  Understanding how these treatments work is the first step to developing treatment option algorithms.  It may not be as daunting as it first seems.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 7

2:20pm

Portosystemic shunts in cats: Are they different?
Increased frequency of drooling (ptyalism) among the clinical signs of cats affected with CPSS along with the presence of Copper coloured iris' are the two main differences cited for cats.  In addition, cats often have less pronounced clinical pathological changes.  Cats also have much more predictable shunt anatomy with predominantly left gastric vein shunts and occasionally  splenocaval shunts present.  Intrahepatic forms are extremely rare.  Cats also seem to be more prone to post attenuation neurological complcations than dogs although, fortunately, if treated promptly, they respond well.  This session will highlight the differences between cats and dogs with this disease but also point out some of the similarities regarding outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Friday August 11, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 6

3:10pm

Afternoon tea
Friday August 11, 2017 3:10pm - 3:50pm
Exhibition Hall

3:50pm

Diagnostic strategy in heart disease
This lecture will focus on the use of readily available diagnostic tools; their indication, appropriate application and accurate interpretation, in order to optimize the diagnostic yield for the general practitioner in their assessment of the cardiac patient.

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Assoc. Prof. Fiona Meyers-Campbell BVSc(Hons) PhD MANZCVS Dip.ACVIM(Cardiology) | Fiona graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Queensland in 1996 and then practiced in the United Kingdom and Australia for 2 years. In 2001, she completed her PhD and... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central B/C

3:50pm

Mandibulectomies: Variations on a theme
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 5

3:50pm

Common respiratory emergencies
When patients present in respiratory distress our response needs to be rapid, efficient and, above all, effective.  Having a simple and logical diagnostic and treatment plan can improve our management of these extremely fragile patients.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Haldane

Sarah Haldane

Sarah graduated from the University of Melbourne. She has worked in emergency and critical care referral practice since 1999, both in private practice and university hospitals.  She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and is a past President of the Anaesthesia, Emergency and Critical Care chapter of the ANZCVS. She has also completed a Masters degree in veterinary education at the University of... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central A

3:50pm

Floppy rabbit syndrome: A case series
 Floppy rabbit syndrome is a reported worldwide phenomenon that presents as an acute onset generalised muscle weakness.  Affected rabbits are unable to move, but can eat if food is placed within reach. Affected rabbits can die but many recover without incident. The aetiology of this syndrome is unknown, and in the past diverse causes such as hypokalaemia, hypoglycaemia and heart disease have all been implicated. There is no known current treatment that affects outcome.
 Although individual cases have been reported, no systematic investigation of the syndrome has been undertaken. Twelve cases of presumed “floppy rabbit” that presented to the Rabbit Doctors @ CARE were used in this study.  Age, sex, and breed and were noted for each rabbit. Blood samples were taken where possible to measure PCV/TP, blood glucose, and electrolytes on admission.  Sequential neurological exams were performed on each rabbit.  Heart rate, temperature and respiratory rate and effort were monitored, and where possible ETCO2 was serially recorded.  Rabbits in the study were followed until they either died, were euthanased or recovered completely. 
Preliminary results show that floppy rabbit syndrome primarily affects young animals (under 1yo at first presentation), there is no known sex or breed predilection and there was no correlation between hypokalaemia, hypoglycaemia or other electrolyte disorders in affected rabbits.  Rabbits that died, all did so of acute respiratory failure leading to hypercapnia.
From this initial study results also suggest that floppy rabbit syndrome may be a lower motor neurone disorder similar to that of polyradiculoneuritis in dogs/ Guillam Barre syndrome in people.  Further investigations including histopathology of post mortem samples and EMG studies of affected rabbits are currently being carried out.
 
 

Speakers
avatar for Gerry Skinner

Gerry Skinner

The Rabbit Drs
Gerry Skinner qualified from Bristol in 2003 after switching careers from archaeology. During her exotics training in the UK she emigrated to Australia and kept emergency and critical care as her main clinical interest, gaining memberships in ECC and she ran a large Emergency Cen... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 9

3:50pm

Acute pancreatitis in dogs: What is really new?
Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common GI presentations to veterinary practice around the world. There have been many recent publications addressing diagnosis of this condition, and to a lesser extent management. But what really has changed in the past decade? Are we any further in being able to help manage this condition.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Mansfield

Caroline Mansfield

Associate Professor, Small Animal Medicine, Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists
Caroline Mansfield BSc BVMS MVM PhD MANZCVS DipECVIM-CA Dr Caroline Mansfield graduated from Murdoch University, Perth sometime last century and worked in mixed animal and small animal practice in Australia and the UK before completing a 3-year residency in small animal medicine at University College, Dublin. She developed an interest in gastroenterology during that time and has continued that clinical and research passion since her return to Australia in 2001. She has authored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, and also numerous textbook chapters. Current clinical research projects include mechanisms involved in canine inflammatory bowel disease, both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas and establishing what viral communities exist in the canine intestine. She is board certified in internal medicine, gaining a Diploma of the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 2001. Caroline is currently Past President of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists. From 2001 until 2010 she was employed at Murdoch University. She moved to the University of Melbourne in late 2010, and is currently Associate Professor and Head of Small Animal Medicine... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Arena 1

3:50pm

Localising the lesion: Where to start looking and what’s on the list
Neurological disease can strike fear into the hearts of many clinicians, but with a (tiny) bit of neuroanatomy, localisation can become straightforward.  Which is just as well, since lesion localisation is essential for working out what your differential diagnosis list should look like and what tests to perform.  This session will cover the basics of working out where the problem is and what the list of differentials looks like.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Long

Sam Long

Neurologist, Centre for Animal Referral and Emergency
Dr Long is a Diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Neurology. After graduating from the University of Melbourne in the last millenium he travelled to the University of Glasgow in Scotland for a residency and PhD, followed by a stint at the University of Pennsylvania in... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 5

3:50pm

Why is treating lymphoma in cats so hard?
 Although there have been major advances in describing and treating dogs with lymphoma, improved response rates and survival have been minimal despite increasingly complex chemotherapy protocols for cats with lymphoma. Conflicting outcome reports for similar protocols may mean that instead of viewing feline lymphoma as a single entity, perhaps we should be looking for alternative ways to categorize this common disease, and evaluating newer treatment combinations that are better tolerated and result in longer remissions and survivals.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Moore

Tony Moore

Co-Director, Veterinary Oncology Consultants
Antony Stewart Moore BVSc, MVScDiplomate - ACVIM (Oncology)Member of the Australia and New Zealand College of Veterinary ScientistsRegistered Specialist in Veterinary Oncology in NSW, AustraliaTony received his veterinary degree in 1981, and a master’s degree in feline haematol... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 7

3:50pm

Medial patella luxation
Patella luxation is a common, heritable condition of dogs and cats. Traditionally medial patella luxation in small breed dogs has been the most common syndrome, however medial and lateral luxation are increasingly seen in medium and large breed dogs. Bilateral disease is common in dogs as well as cats.

Diagnosis is usually not difficult with a thorough physical examination, however radiography is essential before considering treatment options.

In my opinion dogs and cats with lameness, pain or discomfort associated with medial patella luxation should have the condition corrected. Each time the patella luxates there is damage to the articular surface of the patella and medial femoral trochlear ridge.

Many techniques are published. In this lecture, we shall examine the more commonly used techniques and make recommendations for successful treatment. Prevention of complications is the key to success. By combining several techniques, we hope to avoid disasters. Philip Moses will give you the benefit of his many years of surgical practice – and hopefully how to avoid complications – he has seen them all !

Speakers
avatar for Phil Moses

Phil Moses

Director, Veterinary Specialist Services
Graduated from the University of Sydney in 1986 and worked in cattle practice in western NSW and then mixed practices until cured of the desire to become a large animal practitioner. Moved to the UK in 1990 and began the long road to small animal surgical specialisation. Complete... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 6

4:45pm

Optimising management of congestive heart failure in practice
When congestive heart failure is managed well, quality of life is preserved and life-expectancy is optimized. Long-term management of the congestive patient can be readily achieved in the general practice setting and delegates will be equipped with the skills to make appropriate therapeutic decisions and effectively address common complications.


Speakers
avatar for Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Assoc. Prof. Fiona Meyers-Campbell BVSc(Hons) PhD MANZCVS Dip.ACVIM(Cardiology) | Fiona graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Queensland in 1996 and then practiced in the United Kingdom and Australia for 2 years. In 2001, she completed her PhD and... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central B/C

4:45pm

Commonly seen malocclusions and treatment options
Malocclusions can be due to traumatic, nutritional, metabolic or inherited causes. This lecture will discuss some of the more common dental malocclusions including linguoversion (lingually displaced) mandibular canines due to a class 2 malocclusions (mandibular distocclusion) and mesioversion (lance) maxillary canines that occurs in certain breeds of dog and cat.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, James Cook University
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Curren... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 5

4:45pm

Monitoring the critical patient: What do you really need?
Treating patients with critical illness can be daunting in clinical practice.  We will discuss the basics of patient monitoring, how and when they can be used most effectively and the amazing things we can do without requiring of lots of high-tech machines and all the bells and whistles.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Haldane

Sarah Haldane

Sarah graduated from the University of Melbourne. She has worked in emergency and critical care referral practice since 1999, both in private practice and university hospitals.  She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and is a past President of the Anaesthesia, Emergency and Critical Care chapter of the ANZCVS. She has also completed a Masters degree in veterinary education at the University of... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central A

4:45pm

Canine chronic hepatitis
Chronic hepatitis is the most common inflammatory disease in the dog.  Many times it is a silent killer manifesting it's self late in the disease.  The keys to the diagnosis and newer concepts in the therapy will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Arena 1

4:45pm

The movers and shakers: The latest from the world of seizures and epilepsy
Seizures and epilepsy are still the most common neurological condition that causes patients to present to a veterinarian.  Most of us are familiar with the traditional anticonvulsants and how to use them - this session will cover some of the newer drugs that are available, some of the recent advances in terminology and recommendations for treatment and diagnosis, as well as explore a few of the exciting new developments in the field of research that might be seen in animals in the coming years.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Long

Sam Long

Neurologist, Centre for Animal Referral and Emergency
Dr Long is a Diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Neurology. After graduating from the University of Melbourne in the last millenium he travelled to the University of Glasgow in Scotland for a residency and PhD, followed by a stint at the University of Pennsylvania in... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 5

4:45pm

Histiocytic diseases in dogs
Histiocytic disorders represent a group of diseases that are seemingly related and appear to fall more or less into several categories, including reactive diseases (cutaneous histiocytosis, systemic histiocytosis) which affect the skin and less commonly the visceral organs and other sites, and the malignancies; histiocytic sarcoma, and malignant histiocytosis (now termed disseminated histiocytic sarcoma). Even with newer pathology techniques it can be difficult to differentiate these diseases from one another, and the best treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination approach) varies depending on the primary site. This session will help you to sort through the confusing terminology and decide on the best treatment approach for your patient with histiocytic disease. 

Speakers
avatar for Tony Moore

Tony Moore

Co-Director, Veterinary Oncology Consultants
Antony Stewart Moore BVSc, MVScDiplomate - ACVIM (Oncology)Member of the Australia and New Zealand College of Veterinary ScientistsRegistered Specialist in Veterinary Oncology in NSW, AustraliaTony received his veterinary degree in 1981, and a master’s degree in feline haematol... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 7

4:45pm

Cruciate disease: Where is the evidence?
The canine and feline stifle joints are complex and, to be honest, not well designed. Two curved femoral condyles sitting atop a slightly convex tibial plateau interposed by menisci and constrained by muscles and ligaments was never going to be trouble free. In small animal practice stifle problems keep us very busy.
Cranial cruciate ligament disease is one of the more common causes of surgical lameness in dogs and cats. There are hundreds of DIFFERENT techniques published. Everyone who considers him or herself a surgeon has their own technique or their own modified version of someone else’s technique.
This lecture looks at the more common techniques then discusses the evidence (or lack thereof) behind them.
This lecture will not solve the problems of cruciate disease, but instead highlight the lack of good scientific evidence behind the techniques currently available. 

Speakers
avatar for Phil Moses

Phil Moses

Director, Veterinary Specialist Services
Graduated from the University of Sydney in 1986 and worked in cattle practice in western NSW and then mixed practices until cured of the desire to become a large animal practitioner. Moved to the UK in 1990 and began the long road to small animal surgical specialisation. Complete... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 6

5:35pm

International Stand Up Dinner
Enjoy a range of international cuisines and local wines while you explore over 100 exhibition booths at the stand-up dinner.

Inclusive for full delegate registrations and accompanying guest registrations.

Sponsors
avatar for Hill's Pet Nutrition

Hill's Pet Nutrition

Prime Sponsor


Friday August 11, 2017 5:35pm - 7:35pm
Exhibition Hall

7:30pm

UPAV Exotics Dinner and Unusual Quiz Night
This unique evening combines revelry, good food and wine, camaraderie, controversy and fun all in one night. Don’t miss out on this unique event hosted by the Unusual Pet and Avian Veterinarians (UPAV), a special Interest group of the AVA.

Exhibitors
avatar for Oxbow

Oxbow

Specialised Animal Nutrition is the Australian distributor of Oxbow Animal Health and Baraka Station products. | | Oxbow’s premium life-staged feeds and supportive care products for small animals are recommended by top exotic animal veterinarians worldwide. | Baraka Station... Read More →


Friday August 11, 2017 7:30pm - 10:30pm
Foyer E

8:00pm

ASAV Recent Graduate Dinner
We invite all FASAVA/ASAVA members who are 2014-2016 graduates to this very special evening. Share stories of your first years in practice in a welcoming environment.

Sponsors
avatar for Hill's Pet Nutrition

Hill's Pet Nutrition

Prime Sponsor


Friday August 11, 2017 8:00pm - 10:30pm
Central A
 
Saturday, August 12
 

6:45am

Hill’s Pet Nutrition breakfast session
“Giving cats with CKD a reason to jump for joy: the latest in kidney disease management”
Presented by 
Dr Carolyn O'Brien BVSc(Hons) MVetClinStud FANZCVS, Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine, Melbourne Cat Referrals

Sponsors
avatar for Hill's Pet Nutrition

Hill's Pet Nutrition

Prime Sponsor


Saturday August 12, 2017 6:45am - 8:00am
Foyer E

8:15am

Tracheal collapse and bronchomalacia
Cough is a common clinical complaint in dogs and can be associated with infectious, inflammatory, or structural diseases of the airways.  Physical examination can provide important clues to the underlying etiology of disease, however advanced diagnostics are often required to optimize treatment.  Tracheobronchomalacia is an irreversible disease process that requires chronic management.  Strategies for appropriate intervention will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central B/C

8:15am

Crown lengthening
This session will review the indications for crown lengthening and how to perform it on upper and lower canine teeth. The importance of biological width will be emphasized.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 9

8:15am

Emergency approach to the blocked cat
Urethral obstruction in cats in one of the most common but easily curable life threatening emergencies seen in general and emergency practice. Success rates for relieving the obstruction and for long term survival can, and should, approach 100%. This depends upon prompt and accurate assessment of each case, careful but rapid stabilisation prior to urethral catheterisation and optimizing your technique for catheterisation. Come along a hear how to save the vast majority!

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central A

8:15am

Differentiation of feline GI lymphoma from IBD: Does it really matter?
Feline small cell intestinal lymphoma is more prevalent than inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the disorders cannot be differentiated clinically, biochemically, or via ultrasound. Differentiation of small cell lymphoma from IBD is made on the basis of immunohistochemistry and clonality (PARR). The prognosis for most cats with small cell intestinal lymphoma is very good and medical therapy consisting of prednisolone, chlorambucil, and cyanocobalamin is frequently used for cats with IBD and small cell lymphoma. This case-based presentation will highlight the rational diagnostic approach to cats with chronic enteropathies and will also highlight the options available when financial resources preclude a confirmatory diagnosis via intestinal biopsy.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Arena 1

8:15am

Shakes, tremors and twitches I: Overview of movement disorders of dogs and cats
Cats and dogs may develop a variety of unusual movement disorders that bewilder even the most seasoned clinicians because of difficulties in determining their neuro-anatomic origin and aetiology.
From life-altering tremors, to benign sleep-related muscle twitches, these movements are representative of a range of underlying neuropathology, toxicology, neuro-degeneration, or even normal behaviors.
In general, the study of movement disorders encompasses a wide range of neurologic disturbances characterized by excess (hyperkinesia) or reduced (bradykinesia) movements.
These abnormal involuntary movements refer to a number of muscle jerks, twitches, postures, and oscillations, that have been classified in human neurology with accepted terms, such as tic, chorea, tremor, dystonia, and myoclonus.
Many of these disorders are the result of neurodegenerative changes of the basal ganglia in people, a condition not well documented in non-primate species.
Many small animals exhibit a number of movement disorders that merit further investigation and possible therapy.
The purpose of this lecture is to review and discuss the clinical presentation of movement disorders in cats and dogs, with emphasis on tremors and fasciculations.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 5

8:15am

Soft tissue sarcomas
These are common tumours in dogs.  Cats get these tumours too but there are some very specific differences between these two species when it comes to soft tissue sarcomas.  As a group, I think these tumours have been the most poorly managed cancers by our profession. We can cure dogs and most cats with soft tissue sarcomas but we have failed many animals in the past.  Let’s stop failing and start winning.  Give Soft Tissue Sarcomas the flick.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 7

8:15am

Surgical management of congenital and acquired mitral valve disease in dogs
Congenital and acquired mitral valve incompetence and mitral stenosis are considered surgical diseases in man and yet for years the veterinary profession has persisted with medical therapy for this condition.  This is, most likely, for reasons of cost and expertise required for surgical therapy.  Several groups around the world have shown that mitral valve surgery is possible and one group from Japan have shown amazing consistency of short term and long term results following open surgical mitral valve repair.  The techniques required for these therapies, replacement of chordae tendinae and mitral annuloplasty, are demanding and challenging but the rewards can be excellent.  This session will describe the essential elements of an attempt at mitral valve repair and describe the challenges and potential rewards that exist.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 6

8:15am

Global approach to critical patient management
It is essential to develop a systematic assessment of the critical patient that addresses the most common life-threatening problems. A quick evaluation of airway, breathing, circulation and mental state can be made to identify life threatening abnormalities in these systems. Is the patient in pain?
The most common respiratory abnormalities in the trauma patient are pulmonary contusions, pneumothorax and rib fractures, however patients presented to the emergency room also may be in severe respiratory distress associated with a pleural effusion, laryngeal paralysis etc.
The most common and critical cardiovascular problems are hypovolaemia related.
Evidence of brain injury may be obvious, however in some cases due to the depressed state of the patient following major haemorrhage, sequential clinical observations may be necessary to fully assess the patient.
Optimizing tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery is the primary goal of the emergency and critical care clinician when approaching trauma patients, and the non-traumatic critically-ill. 

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 8

9:10am

Bacterial pneumonia: Diagnosis and therapy
Pneumonia is more commonly recognized in dogs than in cats.  Animals will usually have a history of a productive cough, tachypnea, or respiratory difficulty, however, some animals present with more vague signs of illness such as malaise, depression, anorexia, and weight loss.  An early clue to the diagnosis of pneumonia is a change in the respiratory pattern. Abnormal lung sounds may or may not be present but detecting harsh lung sounds is relatively common.  Rational approach to confirmation of the diagnosis and effective management will be discussed.   

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central B/C

9:10am

Dental radiology: Interpretation and cases
A review of normal radiographic anatomy will be followed by identification of periodontal disease, endodontic disease and oral masses.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 9

9:10am

Clinical use of plasma lactate measurement
Lactate is good for you! It allows cells to produce energy and survive when their oxygen supply is severely compromised. Lactate production also protects against acidosis. Measuring lactate adds much to our standard cardiovascular assessment of emergency patients and it’s very cheap to measure to boot! The supporting evidence base has now passed the point of skepticism and lactate measurement deserves to be a standard part of our emergency armory to aid in clinical assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prognostication.

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central A

9:10am

Medicine and surgery of mythological beasts
A light-hearted look at the hypothetical presentations and likely treatments should we ever be presented with some of the more unusual of the unusual pets!

Speakers
avatar for David Neck

David Neck

Dr Neck is a small animal practitioner based in Perth with an active interest in Ferret medicine and general love of the AVA and UPAV. He has memberships to the Australian and New Zealand College in Small Animal Surgery, in Veterinary Radiology, and in Anaesthesia and Intensive C... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Foyer E

9:10am

Demystifying bacterial-associated diarrhea in dogs
Bacterial-associated diarrheas are relatively common in dogs; however, the role of bacteria in causing diarrhea can be confusing because pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria are often isolated from apparently healthy dogs, and the detection of pathogenic bacteria does not inherently denote a cause-and-effect phenomenon. This case-based presentation will highlight specific bacterial-associated diarrhea cases including Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., E. coli, and Clostridium perfringens, and will provide practical and relevant tips on the diagnostic approach to these cases as well as their management. Specific indications for incorporating antimicrobial therapy into the therapeutic regime of affected dogs will also be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Arena 1

9:10am

Shakes, tremors and twitches II: Update on therapy for movement disorders
Movement Disorders, or Paroxysmal Dyskinesias, are being described with increasing frequency in dogs, and may begin to fall into “groups” based on clinical signs, triggers, progression, duration, and frequency of episodes.
None of the canine disorders described seem to fit well into the human category of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, and sometimes triggers are hard to identify in dogs. As more syndromes are described, clinically useful categories of disease may start to be developed based on clinical presentation. However, with the rapid increase in our understanding of the genetic basis of canine neurologic disorders, it is reasonable to hope that these diseases will be classified according to their mutation, and the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying them, in the near future.
The goal for the control of tremors in small animals is to determine the etiology, remove any inciting cause (toxin or iatrogenic), and provide immediate and prolonged symptomatic relief for acquired diseases. A number of treatments for essential chronic tremor disorders have been proposed for people, with varying results.
This lecture will provide an update  on the Diagnostic Approach and recommended Treatments for movement disorders in dogs.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 5

9:10am

Mast cell tumours
I get more calls from veterinarians seeking advice about treatment of animals with mast cell tumours than for any other cancer type.  The disease is different between dogs and cats.  Between individuals there are also differences.  There are different grades, stages, expression of prognostic markers, molecular receptors and their mutations.  The location in the body also has survival and treatment significance and now we have a plethora of treatment options with surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors, glucocorticoids, antihistamines and gastric protectors.  There is a lot of strong opinion and controversy.  It’s a mine field out there!  So let’s try to make some sense of this oncology enigma.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 7

9:10am

Update on surgical options for congenital pulmonic stenosis
Even though pulmonic stenosis, along with patent ductus arteriosus, represent the two most prevalent congenital heart conditions in dogs, the reports describing surgical treatment in the veterinary literature remain few and are typically case reports or case series.  The use of ballon dilation and its success with type A stenosis, in particular, means that theis is the "go to" first line therapy for most affected dogs.  If this treatment fails, what should we do next?  This presentation will explore the options and describe the outcome following open patch grafting using ePTFE patching materials  under conditions of cardiopulmonary bypass.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 6

9:10am

Advanced fluid therapy in acute emergencies
Any disease process (illness, trauma, surgery) may alter an animals homeostasis, resulting in changes in fluid volume and/or electrolyte composition.  When these changes are severe and overwhelm normal body compensation, fluid and electrolyte therapy is warranted.  Although definite patterns of electrolyte and acid/base abnormalities occur with comparable disease conditions, individual differences are common.  In the absence of extensive clinical chemistry data, guidelines can be used for selecting the appropriate type and volume of replacement fluid.

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 8

10:00am

Morning tea
Saturday August 12, 2017 10:00am - 10:40am
Exhibition Hall

10:40am

The ABCs of ECG interpretation
Introduction to the systematic approach ECG interpretation in dogs and cats, including the most common clinically relevant arrhythmias.

Speakers
avatar for Niek Beijerink

Niek Beijerink

Associate Professor, University of Sydney
Niek Beijerink is Associate Professor at the School of Veterinary Science, Sydney University, where he works since 2011. He is a European board certified (ECVIM) specialist in veterinary cardiology. Research: His main research interests are on genetics, pathophysiology and treatment of mitral valve disease and heart failure in dogs. Other research projects are on CT angiography of congenital heart disease, pathology of mitral valve disease, genetics of ventricular septal defects in horses, and the pathogenesis of short QT-syndrome in kangaroos. He is one of the authors of the Chapter on... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central B/C

10:40am

Does periodontal disease affect the rest of the body?
Although it is still difficult to prove a cause and effect relationship between periodontal disease and systemic illnesses, there are a growing number of human studies and a few veterinary studies, which are shedding more light on this possible link. This lecture will look at the current state of play in this fascinating field of periodontal medicine, thus allowing clinicians to more confidently discuss this complex topic with their clients.   

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, James Cook University
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Curren... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 9

10:40am

Management of small animal intoxications: What’s new, what’s old, what works
Most aspects of traditional decontamination have lost some favour in human medicine as a first line of defence with intoxications, as other modalities (haemodialysis, plasmaphoresis, mechanical ventilation, etc) & antidotes (fomepizole, digitoxin-specific Abs, 2-PAM) become more mainstream. Yet, the types of intoxications in small animals together with financial & other limitations make the continued use of emesis, gastric lavage and activated charcoal still warranted in veterinary toxicology. Even so, timing is crucial and there are indications and contraindications depending on the status of the patient and the type of intoxicant. Emetics used have a see-sawing history of favour & disfavour and there are toxin-specific scenarios that need to be considered. These factors will be explored to reflect current veterinary judgement.                                                                                                
The newest antidote, ILE (Intra-Lipid Emulsion) has received rave reviews for many intoxications and veterinary use has mirrored the enthusiastic acceptance of this remedy for all forms of poisonings. Time will tell if it truly is the silver bullet; in the meantime, consideration of the intoxicant, ILE’s mode of action (is it the lipid sink theory valid, or is it simply the increased intra-cellular calcium that protects cardiac myocytes?), and the degree and method of intoxication is prudent to help ensure an effective outcome. The current use of ILE will be detailed.                                                                                               
Old common intoxicants like the LAAC’s (Long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides) always make an interesting discussion as newer more potent agents with a sustained effect demand us to be more diligent in our therapies – some simple rules and tips enhance our chances enormously.                                          
Of the newer emerging poisons, Xylitol, deserves special mention because of its rapidly increasing incidence of canine intoxication which isn’t likely to wane anytime soon because of its common use in human foods.

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central A

10:40am

Melioidoisis in captive Lumholtz’s tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus lumholtzi)
A small colony of captive Lumholtz Tree Kangaroos was diagnosed with suspected melioidosis. The presentation describes the history, clinicial presentation, pathology results and a discussion on health and disease, particularly melioidosis, in this speices in the wet tropics.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Olsson

Annabelle Olsson

Principal, Boongarry Vet Surgery
I am a wildlife, avian, reptile and exotics vet based in Cairns, but with a practice which extends throughout Cape York. I have research degrees in health of free living flying foxes, and anaesthesia in crocodiles. I am President of the Wildlife Conservancy of tropical Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Foyer E

10:40am

Emerging newer liver diseases
There are a number of liver conditions in the dog that are relatively newer disorders that the clinician should be aware of.  Included in this discussion are biliary mucoceles, portal vein hypoplasia, ductal plate disorders and idiopathic vacuolar hepatopathies.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Arena 1

10:40am

Mononeuropathies: The idiopathic and the bad
Mononeuropathies the idiopathic and the bad
Peripheral nerve abnormality (neuropathy) may involve one or multiple  adjacent  peripheral nerves  (mononeuropathy or mononeuropathy multiplex)  and  may cause motor deficits,  sensory deficits or both depending  on the nerve or nerves  affected and the  cause.  Any nerve may be affected.  The clinical signs seen  include lameness or paresis, reduced muscle tone,  spinal reflex abnormality depending on nerve/s affected  and  denervation atrophy (rapid onset) .  Sensory abnormalities including pain, allodynia (abnormal sensation), self trauma and anaesthesia (loss of pain sensation)may be seen associated with some neuropathies.  Cranial nerve dysfunction is seen in specific neuropathies affecting these nerves.
Neuropathies may be the result of   trauma, compression, ischaemia , inflammation , neoplasia  or be idiopathic . Clinical presentation may be acute with severe dysfunction or may be slowly progressive over many months. The severity of clinical signs is not necessarily indicative of prognosis- either for return of function or likely progression.  For some, early recognition is the key to successful treatment and for others  time and supportive care is all that is required  for recovery.
The clinical presentation associated with peripheral neuropathies, diagnostic  considerations  and  recommendations  will be discussed using case examples. 

Speakers
avatar for Georgina Child

Georgina Child

Georgina is a graduate of University of Sydney (1980) and completed a residency in neurology at the University of California Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in 1985. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in Neurology. She has consul... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 5

10:40am

Imaging the cancer patient: When is advanced imaging needed?
Imaging is a crucial step in the staging of veterinary oncology patients.  The results can determine the type of treatment that is most appropriate for the individual patient and in some cases whether treatment is feasible.  Advanced imaging has advantages but this comes at a cost, both financially and in some cases due to the requirement for anaesthesia or contrast agents, an increase in potential adverse effects.  With the increasing availability of advanced imaging, deciding which patients will benefit is something that we all need to consider.
This session will cover the topic based on cases where advanced imaging is critical, those where it is very useful when available and the cases where it adds little.  The  balance between risk and benefit is the determining factor as to how strongly this is recommended.  The type of advanced imaging used will also vary with the site and what we are looking for in the patient.  This presentation will focus on the use of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bennett

Peter Bennett

Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney
Dr Bennett is a graduate of the University of Melbourne. After time in general practice he completed residency training in small animal medicine in 1999 and then joined the faculty of Purdue University in Indiana where he was trained in oncology. He is a Fellow of the Austral... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 7

10:40am

TPLO, TTA, MMTTA, CBLO, TTO, ECCR, TR: Alphabet soup? Or is there a correct stifle stablisation for you?
There are sooo many techniques available now to manage dogs with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures, it is sometimes difficult to provide owners and even yourself with a sensible, defensible recommendation as to the best technique for their pets and your patients. This presentation will examine some of the commonly performed techniques, compare the literature and try to come up with a practical set of guidlines to suit your practice, your patients and their owners' budgets.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Marchevsky

Andrew Marchevsky

Small Animal Specialist Hospital
Andrew is a 1988 Sydney University graduate who did his specialist surgical training at Melbourne and Murdoch Universities during the 90s. A surgical specialist since 1999, he has a wealth of experience in soft tissue, neurological and orthopaedic surgery with, when push comes t... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 6

10:40am

Advanced nursing care of the surgical cancer patient
Surgery remains the mainstay for the treatment of most solid cancers.  Almost all cancer patients will have some form of surgery whether it is biopsy only or definitive resection.  The event or events of surgery for the cancer sufferer have to be carefully planned, expertly executed and painstakingly followed up.  Veterinary nurses play crucial roles during every step.
My fantastic surgical nursing team have provided me input from their hands-on experience working with surgical cancer patients every day.  This has allowed me to deliver this session from the nurse perspective and I will use case examples.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Saturday August 12, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 8

11:35am

Arrhythmia management in dogs and cats
Discussion on the clinical management of the most common arrhythmias encountered in canine and feline cardiology.

Speakers
avatar for Niek Beijerink

Niek Beijerink

Associate Professor, University of Sydney
Niek Beijerink is Associate Professor at the School of Veterinary Science, Sydney University, where he works since 2011. He is a European board certified (ECVIM) specialist in veterinary cardiology. Research: His main research interests are on genetics, pathophysiology and treatment of mitral valve disease and heart failure in dogs. Other research projects are on CT angiography of congenital heart disease, pathology of mitral valve disease, genetics of ventricular septal defects in horses, and the pathogenesis of short QT-syndrome in kangaroos. He is one of the authors of the Chapter on... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central B/C

11:35am

Maxillectomies: Variations on another theme
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 9

11:35am

Cats are not small dogs: How cats handle their critical diseases
The cat is a unique creature who seems to do things differently to what we expect or want, and the same goes for their response to diseases. Although they share many disease with their canine cousins, they often are affected in different ways, and many times they present dissimilarly; certainly their defence mechanisms behave in a disparate fashion to the dog. Many medications have exclusive uses in the cat, and there are many drugs for which cats have increased susceptibility, hence caution in their use is paramount – these will be discussed.                                                             
Transfusion therapy underlines major differences between the dog and cat, with felines having just three major blood groupings – A, B, AB. That being so, most cats have naturally occurring antibodies against foreign RBC, therefore must be crossmatched prior to transfusions – there are no universal donors – as giving a cat an incompatible transfusion can be fatal. Further, in 2007 there was identified a novel RBC Ag (Mik Ag), an alloantibody that’s not identified during traditional Ab blood typing, which helped explain why it is in the patient’s interest to type-specific cross-match. Curiously, Xenotransfusion (giving dog’s blood to cats) has received positive prominence where compatible feline blood is unobtainable, transfusion with canine blood may be considered as a life-saving procedure – benefits, although profound, are very short-lived (<4 days), and any repeated infusion with canine blood >4-6 days after the first transfusion causes anaphylaxis (frequently fatal).                              
As a case example, in acute urethral obstruction, both cats & dogs present as acute emergencies with similar organ system derangements, notably azotaemia and hyperkalaemia. However the cat doesn’t often show the classic ECG changes that we have learnt from the textbooks with increasing levels of serum potassium. This condition highlights how we must tailor our treatment and monitoring to allow for the idiosyncrasies of the feline patient.                                                              
Sepsis is another disease where the cat seems to process and manifest in a disparate fashion to the dog. Distributive shock in the feline is likely to be associated with bradycardia, and a septic cat is more likely to present pale & hypodynamic (hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension)  

Speakers
avatar for Terry King

Terry King

Veterinary Specialist Services
Terry, a native of Northern Australia, graduated from the University of Queensland, School of Veterinary Science in 1975 and spent the next 19 years in private practice in outer suburban (mostly small animal) Brisbane.  After a year's sojourn in the USA and Brisbane's Animal Emergency Centre, Terry joined the University of Queensland Veterinary Teaching Hospital in 1995 as a medical resident, becoming Director of the Clinic and Hospital from 1997 - 2002. Since then he has been part of the fantastic referral team at Veterinary Specialist Services in Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central A

11:35am

A practical guide to the bloated rabbit: Diagnosis and management of small intestinal obstruction (bloat) in rabbits
Inappetent rabbits present to veterinary clinics daily. As our understanding of rabbit medicine improves we are able to separate out those with gut stasis, caecal problems, systemic problems and bloat, allowing us to treat more accurately and with better results. Bloat is easy to misdiagnose as gut stasis but the problem is often more acute and life threatening requiring different treatment. Understanding of the disease process and how to clinically assess a rabbit will assist a general practitioner in making a correct diagnosis. Discussion will include readily available (and achievable in practice) diagnostic procedures (blood tests, radiographs and clinical examination) as well as a discussion of management options including medical and surgical, and when each option might be appropriate. Case examples of medical and surgical management (successful and unsuccessful) will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for Lizzie Selby

Lizzie Selby

Warranwood Veterinary Clinic
Lizzie has a strong interest in all unusual pets with a particular passion for small mammals. She currently works at Warranwood Veterinary Centre and The Rabbit Doctors and sees 90% exotic patients as a primary and referral veterinarian. 


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Foyer E

11:35am

Feline liver diseases and triaditis syndrome
This presentation will cover the diagnosis and treatment of common feline liver diseases.  Feline triaditis syndrome (cholangitis, pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease) is more common than you may think.  Diagnostic clues and the current thoughts on management will be presented.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Arena 1

11:35am

My approach to the patient presenting with spinal cord disease
Spinal  cord disease is common in dogs (a little less so in cats)  and can be caused by abnormality of the surrounding tissue including vertebrae, intervertebral discs, tumour, haematoma or infection compressing the spinal cord  or can occur as a result of abnormalities of the meninges or disease of the spinal cord itself. All may be focal, multifocal or more diffuse depending on disease process.  
Early diagnosis and treatment of spinal cord disease is usually associated with a better prognosis and the early diagnosis and consideration of surgical options is critical for some (any cause of spinal cord compression - especially IV disc extrusion). “Seeing how things go” with empiric treatment is not appropriate for many spinal cord diseases. However, in some instances treatment can be instituted on a best guess based on clinical presentation. The prognosis associated with various neurologic diseases should also be considered prior to embarking on often expensive diagnostic testing however severe neurologic abnormality is not necessarily associated with the poorest prognosis.
Identification and localization of spinal cord abnormality is the first step. The likely causes should be considered prior to undertaking further diagnostic tests or treatment and this list may be narrowed based on signalment and likelihood of a particular diagnosis but in most cases it is not possible to identify a cause just based on neurologic findings. Radiography, advanced imaging (myelography, CT or MRI), serology and/or CSF analysis may be required to arrive at a more definitive diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.
The indications for diagnostic testing, advantages, disadvantages and the likely information to be gained from these tests will be discussed. 

Speakers
avatar for Georgina Child

Georgina Child

Georgina is a graduate of University of Sydney (1980) and completed a residency in neurology at the University of California Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in 1985. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in Neurology. She has consul... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 5

11:35am

When and why do I need to order immunohistochemistry?
It is not uncommon to see in the comments section of a pathology report that immunohistochemistry and be performed to provide additional information.  Do we need to do this?  How is this going to help in the management of the case?  In some cases this can add time to the time taken for a pathological diagnosis, and this needs to be considered.
Lymphoma is the tumour where immunohistochemistry or immunocytochemistry is utilised.  While there are some cases where it can help in making the diagnosis of lymphoma, in many cases it is used to define the disease further.  Lymphoma is not one disease and the prognosis and treatment for some of the subtypes we know is very different.  Using immunohistochemistry is of value for the client and the veterinarian in determining what happens to the patient.  
We use immunohistochemistry in solid tumours less often, but there are still some times when they can be useful.  In mast cell tumours there is still some debate about the role of immunohistochemistry in the decision making process for this disease.   

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bennett

Peter Bennett

Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney
Dr Bennett is a graduate of the University of Melbourne. After time in general practice he completed residency training in small animal medicine in 1999 and then joined the faculty of Purdue University in Indiana where he was trained in oncology. He is a Fellow of the Austral... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 7

11:35am

GIT surgery: Making it easier in practice
Gastrointestinal surgery is probably the most common non-elective abdominal surgery performed in general practice. It is easy to get it right but equally easy to fall into bad habits and end up with a less than ideal outcome. This lecture will look at some practical tips and techniques to ensure that we are doing the best we can. What are the best suturing techniques, how can we best avoid contamination, how to get to those tricky places (duodenal flexure anyone?) and even the Marchevsky guide to a quick GDV

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Marchevsky

Andrew Marchevsky

Small Animal Specialist Hospital
Andrew is a 1988 Sydney University graduate who did his specialist surgical training at Melbourne and Murdoch Universities during the 90s. A surgical specialist since 1999, he has a wealth of experience in soft tissue, neurological and orthopaedic surgery with, when push comes t... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 6

11:35am

Advanced anaesthesia management of the compromised patient
Compromised patients present a unique challenge - and increased anaesthetic risk - to the veterinary team. Join us as we discuss a sound approach to anaesthesia of the emergency and critically ill patient - including how to reduce anaesthetic risk, how to select drugs appropriately, and how to manage complications. 

Speakers
avatar for Philip Judge

Philip Judge

Director of Education, Vet Education Pty Ltd
BVSc MVS PG Cert Vet Stud MACVSc (Vet. Emergency and Critical Care; Medicine of Dogs) | Following graduation from Massey University in 1992, Philip worked for 7 years in small animal private practice before undertaking a residency in veterinary emergency and critical care at th... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 8

12:25pm

Lunch
Saturday August 12, 2017 12:25pm - 1:25pm
Exhibition Hall

1:25pm

Pulmonary hypertension: Recognition and management
Definitive diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is obtained when a mean pulmonary artery pressure exceeding 25 mm Hg is detected during cardiac catheterization. However, with the advancement, techniques in Doppler echocardiography increased pressure with the pulmonary arterial system can be demonstrated with less invasive means.  In veterinary medicine, PH can complicate a variety of commonly encountered cardiopulmonary conditions, and early recognition will aid in management of disease.

Speakers
avatar for Lynelle Johnson

Lynelle Johnson

Professor, University of California
Dr Lynelle Johnson received her veterinary degree from The Ohio State University, was in private practice in New York for 3 years, and completed a Masters Degree and residency program at the University of Illinois. She is Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal M... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central B/C

1:25pm

Flap design: A tension releasing process
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 9

1:25pm

New concepts in fluid therapy: How to feel comfortable NOT using colloids
Given the current weight of evidence, colloids may well fail an overall cost/benefit analysis in our patients. Treating a low albumin/total solids/COP seems to be of much lesser importance and may actually be futile or harmful. Can we smile confidently in the face of hypoalbuminemia? We will exercise our brains with some in depth pathophysiology that will (hopefully) leave us all feeling much more comfortable Just Saying No! to colloids. Most of the time.

Speakers
avatar for Dez Hughes

Dez Hughes

Associate Professor and Service Head, Emergency and Critical Care, University of Melbourne
I grew up in Sunderland in North-east England then went to vet school in Liverpool. I then sped off to the University of Pennsylvania where I did my internship and ECC residency. I was ACVECC board certified in 1994 then worked in Penn’s Emergency Service for the next 7 years... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central A

1:25pm

An update on Macrorhabdus ornithogaster
Macrorhabdus ornithogaster is a yeast that grows only at the isthmus of the ventriculus and proventriculus in birds. It causes proventriculitis, vomiting, diarrhoea and chronic wasting disease in a wide variety of species. A range of treatment protocols have been suggested, many of which have very little success in eliminating the infection. This talk will summarise our current knowledge and examine a variety of novel treatment modalities. 
 

Speakers
avatar for Hamish Baron

Hamish Baron

Resident Veterinarian, University of Sydney - Avian Reptile and Exotic
Hamish Baron is a resident in avian medicine at the Avian Reptile and Exotic Pet Hospital at the University of Sydney. Passionate about all things birds, he is currently undertaking a research masters degree examining macrorhabdus ornithogaster in an attempt to improve treatment... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Foyer E

1:25pm

Probiotics: What’s the evidence for their benefit in diarrheic dogs and cats?
There is increasing evidence documenting the benefits of probiotic therapy for diarrheic dogs and cats, and this seminar will provide a comprehensive overview highlighting the rational selection of probiotics, with an emphasis on the quality of the manufacturer, bacterial strains, and number of CFUs (colony forming units). This seminar will also review specific studies that have been published in the peer-reviewed literature, while discussing the strengths and limitations of each study. Finally, the seminar will highlight other methods for modulating the intestinal microbiome, including the advent of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and intestinal parasites.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Marks

Stanley Marks

Professor, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine
Stanley L. Marks BVSc, PhD, DACVIM (Internal Medicine, Oncology), DACVNProfessor of Internal MedicineDr. Stan Marks graduated from the University of Pretoria, South Africa, and completed an internship in small animal medicine and surgery at the University of Missouri, Columbia. H... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Arena 1

1:25pm

Inflammatory CNS diseases of dogs: GME, NME, or NE?
Inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases are a group of sporadic inflammatory diseases that affect the brain and/or spinal cord of dogs in the absence of an infectious cause (ie, pathogen-free).
Based on histopathological findings, 3 distinct forms of inflammatory CNS disease have been identified in dogs:
a. Granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME): Canine GME is the current term for an idiopathic CNS disease (most likely first described in 1936). GME still attracts a confusing and lengthy number of synonyms reflecting changes only in immunologic terminology (eg, inflammatory reticulosis, lympho-reticulosis, neoplastic reticulosis).
b. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME): Canine NME was originally recognized in dogs in the U.S. in the 1970’s as a breed-specific disease of pug dogs (colloquially known as “pug dog encephalitis”). Since 1989, based on morphologically defined lesion patterns and histology, NME has been recognized in other small-breed dogs, including Maltese, Chihuahua, Pekinese, Boston terrier, Shih Tzu, Coton de Tulear, and Papillon.
c. Necrotizing encephalitis (NE): Canine NE was first described in 1993 in Yorkshire terriers and has been reported in other breeds, including French bulldogs. This lecture will summarise the Diagnosis and Management of these common CNS disorders of dogs.

Speakers
avatar for Richard LeCouteur

Richard LeCouteur

Richard A. LeCouteur, BVSc, PhD, Diplomate ACVIM(Neurology), Diplomate ECVN. Dr. LeCouteur graduated from the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, in 1975. After a year in private small animal practice in Sydney, Australia, he completed an Internship and Residency... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:25pm

Osteosarcoma
Dogs and humans get osteosarcoma (OSA) and their diseases are almost identical.  We have learned so much in the last couple of decades.  The standard of care; amputation and chemotherapy for dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) can provide good results.  However, the diagnostic and management pitfalls are important to know.  Then there are those cases with axial skeleton OSA or primary tumours in uncommon locations.  These cases are often problematic.  Complexity also increases when considering palliative care, limb-sparing surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, amputation techniques and hemipelvectomy, endoprostheses, bio-integrated prostheses, combination chemotherapy, antimetastatic drugs and immunotherapy.  There are now many options for clients with dogs with OSA and this cancer in dogs provides the opportunity for clinical trials where results translate to the human clinic.

Speakers
avatar for Rod Straw

Rod Straw

Director - Owner, BVSC
Specialist Surgeon (oncology) & Director of The Australian Animal Cancer Foundation


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 7

1:25pm

“Look mum, it’s a twister”: Gastric, splenic, intestinal, hepatic and lung torsion
For most practitioners, diagnosing a gastric torsion, the most commonly twisted organ, is a rare event.  The impact organ torsion has on the whold body depends on whether the whole or just part of the organ is involved and how "mission critical" that organ is to body function.  For example, a dog can survive many days with a solitary lung lobe torsion (because there are several other lobes that are unaffected) but an intestinal torsion around the root of the mesentery, can have peracute devastating effects.  In this presentation, the author hopes to highlight which pathophysiological events might be common to organs that undergo partial or complete torsion and will then consider each disease as a separate entity to highlight key diagnostic steps for each, along with concerns associated with each specific organ and the the current best treatment practices.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Brockman

Daniel Brockman

Professor of Small Animal Surgery, Royal Veterinary College
I am a trained small animal surgeon who practices soft tissue surgery with an interest in gastrointestinal, urogenital and plastic and reconstructive surgery and a particular interest are cardiothoracic and vascular surgery.


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 6

1:25pm

Occupational stress and compassion fatigue in the ECC and referral setting
Occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal-related occupations has gained momentum over the last decade. The impact of these conditions on employee mental wellbeing, workplace productivity and morale is notable and has become more recognised by those who are employed in animal-related occupations. 
There has been an increase in recognition of work-related mental health disorders affecting all industries and professions worldwide (Australian Safety and Compensation Council 2006).
With an estimated cost of AUD$200 million dollars annually, workers’ compensation claims for stress-related mental disorders in Australia are on an upward trajectory. Data collected by Work Safe Australia show not only an increase in workers’ compensation claims for stress-related conditions and mental disorders (5700 in 1997/98 to 8260 in 2004/05) but also in the duration of claims where median time lost for mental disorders suffered at work rose from 6.8 weeks in 1997/98 to 9.7 weeks per claim in 2004/05 (Guthrie et al. 2010). Mental stress is understood to be the foremost causative factor of work-related mental disorders in Australia, with exposure to a traumatic event and work pressure being the most commonly reported mechanisms (Australian Safety and Compensation Council 2006).
According to The National Data Set for Compensation-based Statistics (NDS), the industries with the highest claims or incidence were health and community services and education and personal and other services. The highest claims according to occupational groups were professionals, and intermediate clerical, sales and service workers. However, extremely high incidence rates were also evident for police officers, prison officers and social welfare professionals and school teachers (Australian Safety and Compensation Council 2006). These findings are consistent with the extensive literature published in the human health care and social sciences sector. 
Martins Pereira et al. (2011) state that the experience of working with high levels of death and dying puts those who work in emergency and palliative care at particular risk of burnout and compassion fatigue (Martins Pereira et al. 2011). Similarly, those who work in emergency, oncology and other care-giving occupations also have a high prevalence of occupational stress and compassion fatigue (Najjar et al. 2009, Hooper et al. 2010, Potter et al. 2010, Ray et al.2013). Nonetheless, it appears that job satisfaction remains comparatively high in these occupations. Whilst there are a great number of articles and published research examining compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction in human healthcare occupations, there is little focus on those working in animal healthcare and other animal-related occupations.
 This presentation is based on a study conducted to investigate the incidence of compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction and burnout in those working in animal-related occupations across South East Queensland with a focus on results from those working in ECC and referral practices.
 

Speakers
avatar for Rebekah Scotney

Rebekah Scotney

School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland
Rebekah graduated from The University of Queensland (UQ) in 1993, taking her first position within the School of Veterinary Science shortly thereafter. Rebekah is an experienced Veterinary Technical Officer, qualified Veterinary Nurse and Workplace Trainer and Assessor. She has a strong background in animal welfare, behaviour and ethics. And, with more than 15... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 8

2:20pm

Plenary: From frocks to crocs: One vet’s journey - Sponsored by Hill's Pet Nutrition
Growing up in bushland on the upper North Shore of Sydney was the beginning of a lifelong obsession with all creatures great and small. From the hallowed halls firstly of a Methodist Ladies College and then Sydney University, life took a series of unplanned and unexpected turns from working in zoos, rural practice and even sailing the Australian coastline. Then in the late '80s I arrived in Cairns for a two week locum and the rest, as the saying goes, is history. In the intervening years I have co-founded the first wildlife rehabilitation group in the region, become involved in indigenous animal health programmes throughout Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait islands, raised six children, chased cassowaries and crocodiles all over the Cape and found time in between to gain two higher degrees and dual College membership as well as running a busy avian, reptile, wildlife and exotics practice, which extends throughout the region. In my spare time I teach courses in animal health, wildlife medicine and rehabilitation and drugs and poisons legislation. I have been fortunate enough to consult throughout the Asia Pacific region for species as diverse as macaques, tigers and other big cats, and crocodiles. My career highlight is undoubtedly being asked to give a series of lectures on wildlife medicine and conservation biology to a large group of international veterinarians on tour in Galapagos.  My life motto is to not take oneself too seriously, so this session will hopefully present an entertaining view of one vet's journey to the wilds of frontier land.

Speakers
avatar for Annabelle Olsson

Annabelle Olsson

Principal, Boongarry Vet Surgery
I am a wildlife, avian, reptile and exotics vet based in Cairns, but with a practice which extends throughout Cape York. I have research degrees in health of free living flying foxes, and anaesthesia in crocodiles. I am President of the Wildlife Conservancy of tropical Queensland... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Arena 1

3:10pm

Afternoon tea
Saturday August 12, 2017 3:10pm - 3:50pm
Exhibition Hall

3:50pm

Feline heart disease, hypertension and hyperthyroidism: Putting it all together
Understanding the interplay between heart disease, hypertension and hyperthyroidism in the feline patient can be challenging. This lecture aims to simplify the diagnostic approach when one or more of these commonly encountered conditions is suspected and provide direction for optimal clinical management.

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Assoc. Prof. Fiona Meyers-Campbell BVSc(Hons) PhD MANZCVS Dip.ACVIM(Cardiology) | Fiona graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Queensland in 1996 and then practiced in the United Kingdom and Australia for 2 years. In 2001, she completed her PhD and... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central B/C

3:50pm

Dental nerve blocks and pain management for the dental patient
Local and regional anesthesia is indicated for any painful oral or dental procedure. This lecture will describe the techniques and equipment needed to administer dental nerve blocks to help control pain in dental or oral surgery patients.

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 9

3:50pm

Analgesia in the small animal emergency patient
“First do no harm”.  We will discuss the analgesics available in veterinary practice, why some are better than others in emergency patients and the best way to mix and match medications to get an analgesic regime suitable for each individual patient.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Haldane

Sarah Haldane

Sarah graduated from the University of Melbourne. She has worked in emergency and critical care referral practice since 1999, both in private practice and university hospitals.  She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and is a past President of the Anaesthesia, Emergency and Critical Care chapter of the ANZCVS. She has also completed a Masters degree in veterinary education at the University of... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central A

3:50pm

3:50pm

Chronic pancreatitis in dogs and cats: Diagnostic and treatment dilemmas
Pancreatitis is a disease that occurs in acute, chronic, mild and severe forms in both dogs and cats. There has been extensive work on the past decade investigating new methods of diagnosis and the pathogenesis of the disease in both companion animals and people. Whilst many of these tests have a relatively high sensitivity for acute pancreatitis (or an ability to detect disease when it is present), the sensitivity of these assays diminishes when the pancreatic inflammation is chronic. Assessment of treatment options of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is sadly lacking in the veterinary literature, and is still controversial in the medical field.

Speakers
avatar for Caroline Mansfield

Caroline Mansfield

Associate Professor, Small Animal Medicine, Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists
Caroline Mansfield BSc BVMS MVM PhD MANZCVS DipECVIM-CA Dr Caroline Mansfield graduated from Murdoch University, Perth sometime last century and worked in mixed animal and small animal practice in Australia and the UK before completing a 3-year residency in small animal medicine at University College, Dublin. She developed an interest in gastroenterology during that time and has continued that clinical and research passion since her return to Australia in 2001. She has authored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, and also numerous textbook chapters. Current clinical research projects include mechanisms involved in canine inflammatory bowel disease, both the endocrine and exocrine pancreas and establishing what viral communities exist in the canine intestine. She is board certified in internal medicine, gaining a Diploma of the European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 2001. Caroline is currently Past President of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists. From 2001 until 2010 she was employed at Murdoch University. She moved to the University of Melbourne in late 2010, and is currently Associate Professor and Head of Small Animal Medicine... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Arena 1

3:50pm

Getting into the right headspace: Intracranial disease and what to do about it
Diseases that affect the brain of patients can cause serious head scratching for clinicians.  This session will look at some of the more common (and some of the less common) causes for brain disease in dogs and cats and how you can get to grips with them.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Long

Sam Long

Neurologist, Centre for Animal Referral and Emergency
Dr Long is a Diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Neurology. After graduating from the University of Melbourne in the last millenium he travelled to the University of Glasgow in Scotland for a residency and PhD, followed by a stint at the University of Pennsylvania in... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 5

3:50pm

How can we use the immune system to help us treat cancer?
Immunotherapy is a hot topic of discussion in oncological research.  It has been known for a long time that the immune system can help with the management of cancer in patients, but not all attempts to use the immune system have been successful.  It has also been shown in more recent years that some of the traditional therapies, including chemotherapy, do have some of their effects through modulation of the immune system.  
There are some commercially available therapies in veterinary medicine that are modulators of the immune system.  There are many more that are used in experimental settings and a vast number currently in trial and development in human oncology.  
This session will look a the types of immunotherapy and the current information on their potential utility. 

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bennett

Peter Bennett

Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney
Dr Bennett is a graduate of the University of Melbourne. After time in general practice he completed residency training in small animal medicine in 1999 and then joined the faculty of Purdue University in Indiana where he was trained in oncology. He is a Fellow of the Austral... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 7

3:50pm

Hip luxation: Key strategies for effective treatment (and errors to avoid)
The coxofemoral joint is the most commonly luxated joint in small animal practice. Hip luxation accounts for 90% of luxations in cats and dogs. The most common cause is trauma – automobile or falling from a height. The extent of soft tissue damage varies and is significant prognostically.
We will look at physical examination and differentiating between the various types of luxation. Radiographic assessment is examined. We will then look at techniques for closed reduction. Closed reduction may be successful in approximately 50% of cases, though recurrence is common.
Open reduction may be necessary if closed reduction is unsuccessful. Many techniques are described. As with many surgical procedures the plethora of published techniques suggests that there is no single technique that will resolve all cases.
This lecture examines the more commonly used techniques and we make suggestions that may be useful in helping to avoid recurrence as well as long term osteoarthritis. 

Speakers
avatar for Phil Moses

Phil Moses

Director, Veterinary Specialist Services
Graduated from the University of Sydney in 1986 and worked in cattle practice in western NSW and then mixed practices until cured of the desire to become a large animal practitioner. Moved to the UK in 1990 and began the long road to small animal surgical specialisation. Complete... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 6

3:50pm

Advanced resuscitation: More than just fluid therapy
The sickest patients require a multi-faceted approach to resuscitation. This may include novel approaches to fluid therapy, cardiovascular support, and oxygen delivery. In this lecture Dr Webster will walk through the decision making process for resuscitation of patients with GDV, severe haemorrhage, and septic shock. The focus will be on selection of an appropriate strategy for each patient, how to perform the procedures, and how to monitor the results. 

Speakers
avatar for Robert Webster

Robert Webster

Animal Emergency Service
Rob Webster BVSc (hons) FANZCVS (emergency medicine and critical care) Rob Webster graduated from The University of Queensland in 2000. He went straight into emergency practice at the Animal Emergency Centre in Brisbane and never left! Rob embarked on a training program in emergency medicine and critical care under the guidance of Prof Steve Haskins in 2006. As well as studying towards his Australian certification, Rob started the Animal Emergency Service in 2005. Rob passed the fellowship examinations and registered as a veterinary specialist in 2014. Animal Emergency Service currently has 5 practices on The Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, Brisbane, and Perth. Robs clinical interests are mechanical ventilation and critical care of patients with tick paralysis (Ixodes... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 8

4:45pm

Challenging cardiac case studies
Using case examples, this lecture will cover some of the common and not-so-common challenges faced in general practice in management of cardiac patients and how to approach these challenging scenarios most appropriately to optimize patient outcome.

Speakers
avatar for Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Fiona Meyers-Campbell

Assoc. Prof. Fiona Meyers-Campbell BVSc(Hons) PhD MANZCVS Dip.ACVIM(Cardiology) | Fiona graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science from the University of Queensland in 1996 and then practiced in the United Kingdom and Australia for 2 years. In 2001, she completed her PhD and... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central B/C

4:45pm

Advanced periodontal disease: Treatment and options
Decision-making and treatment planning for patients with moderate to advanced periodontal disease. Discussion of regenerative periodontal surgery for preserving teeth will also be presented. 

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 9

4:45pm

Transfusion medicine
Why would we give blood?  When should we give it?  What type of blood product should we give?  How do we do it?  This session will cover the whys, whens, whats and hows of blood transfusion in dogs and cats. 

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Haldane

Sarah Haldane

Sarah graduated from the University of Melbourne. She has worked in emergency and critical care referral practice since 1999, both in private practice and university hospitals.  She is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care and is a past President of the Anaesthesia, Emergency and Critical Care chapter of the ANZCVS. She has also completed a Masters degree in veterinary education at the University of... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central A

4:45pm

Avian paediatrics
The time between hatch to fledging in young birds is a stressful time for both veterinarian and patient. So many things can go wrong in such a small patient! Crop stasis, stunting, limb deformities, infectious diseases and other problems will be discussed using common sense, logical approaches to diagnosing them, and how to treat them. 
 

Speakers
avatar for Bob Doneley

Bob Doneley

UPAV Committee, UQ Veterinary Medical Centre
Bob Doneley graduated from the University of Queensland in 1982. After working as an associate in veterinary practices in Bundaberg, Brisbane, the UK, and Toowoomba, he opened the West Toowoomba Vet Surgery in 1988. Bob sold the practice in August 2010, initially to take up the p... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Foyer E

4:45pm

Copper associated liver diseases
Copper associated liver disease is more common than you think.  Breed associated, dietary induced and cholestatic liver disease are all responsible.  The keys to the diagnosis and therapy will be presented.  Therapy is often very successful in management of these cases.

Speakers
avatar for David Twedt

David Twedt

Professor, Clorado State University
Dr. David C. Twedt graduated from Iowa State University and entered an internship and medicine residency in gastroenterology at The Animal Medical Center in New York City. Dr. Twedt then joined the staff of the Animal Medical Center and was also a research associate at the Liver... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Arena 1

4:45pm

Ataxia and unsteady gaits: An update on spinal cord disease
Spinal cord conditions come in lots of different shapes and sizes, as do the patients who carry them.  This session will cover what spinal cord disease can look like and discuss some of the moe common causes and what we can do to treat them.

Speakers
avatar for Sam Long

Sam Long

Neurologist, Centre for Animal Referral and Emergency
Dr Long is a Diplomate of the European College of Veterinary Neurology. After graduating from the University of Melbourne in the last millenium he travelled to the University of Glasgow in Scotland for a residency and PhD, followed by a stint at the University of Pennsylvania in... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 5

4:45pm

How to monitor and manage the sick cancer patient
Oncology patients can become seriously unwell due to their cancer or its treatment.  As they are often older patients they have an increased risk of confounding illnesses that can interact with the cancer or its treatment to increase the risk of adverse events.   With the use of advanced imaging, we are also finding occult concurrent illnesses that also can influence the treatment and prognosis.
Management of adverse events to treatment and signs related to the cancer is important as we want patients to have a good quality of life through this time.  While they cannot be avoided in all patients, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the risk such as pre-emptive treatments.  Identifying the cause of illness in an oncology patient does not always affect the acute management of the signs, but it can influence the longer term decisions for the patient. 

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bennett

Peter Bennett

Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney
Dr Bennett is a graduate of the University of Melbourne. After time in general practice he completed residency training in small animal medicine in 1999 and then joined the faculty of Purdue University in Indiana where he was trained in oncology. He is a Fellow of the Austral... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 7

4:45pm

Locking plates: What are they and how will they change your life
Fracture management with traditional plating techniques has undergone a paradigm shift over the past 20 years. For many fractures, anatomic reduction using a dynamic compression plate was regarded as the gold standard. However, minimally invasive approaches combined with biologically friendly internal fixation have become more accepted methods of fracture management, particularly for complex fractures. The orthopaedic literature has demonstrated significant advantages of locking plate techniques over traditional compression plating techniques.
The advantages of locking plates apply most directly to cases with highly comminuted fractures, unstable metaphyseal or diaphyseal segments, and osteoporotic fractures. The biomechanical properties of locking plates have distinguished and defined their clinical use compared to traditional plates. A thorough understanding of these properties will assist the surgeon in choosing the appropriate construct when faced with a difficult fracture.
This lecture examines the use of locking plates in veterinary orthopaedics and welcomes the veterinary orthopaedic surgeon to the 21st Century. 

Speakers
avatar for Phil Moses

Phil Moses

Director, Veterinary Specialist Services
Graduated from the University of Sydney in 1986 and worked in cattle practice in western NSW and then mixed practices until cured of the desire to become a large animal practitioner. Moved to the UK in 1990 and began the long road to small animal surgical specialisation. Complete... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 6

4:45pm

ICU nursing: The ins and outs of the job
Nursing in an ICU setting can be daunting due to the wide variety of illnesses our patients present with.   While the ICU can be a high stress environment with constantly changing scenarios, being able to balance patient care, time management and people management is a huge part of the job.    This lecture focuses on tips to improve patient care and job satisfaction for any nurse but with emphasis on the ICU nurse.    

Speakers
LP

Lisa Partel

Nurse Trainer, University of Sydney Teaching Hospital
Lisa has worked as a veterinary nurse for the last 15 years, starting out in general practice where she obtained her Cert IV in Veterinary Nursing. She moved on after 6 years to work in a specialist referral hospital in Brisbane where she worked in all aspects of referral medicine including anaesthesia/surgery, internal medicine and ICU. During this time she obtained Veterinary Technician Specialist in Emergency... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 8

5:45pm

Australiana Night - Aussie Party Night
Join us on the ultimate Australiana Experience at the Paradise Country Australiana Night.

This once in a lifetime evening includes bus transfers to and from the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, a welcome campfire with billy tea, meet and greet with some iconic Australian furry friends, a full buffet dinner and drinks in the open air farmhouse restaurant and some true-blue Australian entertainment. Numbers are limited so do not miss out on this uniquely Australian experience.

Buses depart Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre at 5.45pm with arrival back at Convention Centre by 10.15pm.

Sponsors
avatar for Boehringher Ingelheim

Boehringher Ingelheim

Silver Sponsor
Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health business is the second largest company in the global animal health market, and is the top provider worldwide of parasiticides and vaccines for production animals and pets. Boehringer Ingelheim is committed to researching, developing and manufact... Read More →


Saturday August 12, 2017 5:45pm - 10:15pm
Room 8
 
Sunday, August 13
 

6:30am

Dermcare Scrub Run
The Dermcare Scrub Run is an annual charity fun run for vets. Join us at sunrise for a run along the stunning shoreline of the Gold Coast, followed by breakfast, where you can socialise with other vets from all over Asia. There is an option for everyone, regardless of your fitness level, with both a 5km run and a 2.5km walk. Funds raised will go to the Soi Dog Foundation, a charity that rescues and cares for thousands of street dogs in Thailand every year.

Sponsors
avatar for Dermcare

Dermcare

Gold Sponsor
Dermcare Vet was founded in 1981 by Professor Kenneth Mason (veterinary dermatologist) and remains 100% Australian owned, with distribution throughout Asia. Malaseb is sold under licence in the US and UK. Our high quality products and technical support help vets manage dermatolog... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 6:30am - 8:00am
Kurrawa Park, Gold Coast

6:45am

Royal Canin breakfast session
"Food allergy in cats: when to suspect, and what's new for diagnosis?"
Presented by
Dr Linda Vogelnest BVSc (Hons) MACVS FANZCVS

Sponsors
avatar for Royal Canin

Royal Canin

Gold Sponsor
ROYAL CANIN® is a global leader in pet health nutrition. Since its foundation in France in 1968, ROYAL CANIN® has maintained a unique philosophy of putting cats and dogs first through precise and individualised nutrition. | | Underpinned by science and observation, our innovat... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 6:45am - 8:00am
Foyer E

8:15am

Dental extractions in rabbits and rodents
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 9

8:15am

Is this dog atopic? Diagnosis of atopy
Atopy is a clinical diagnosis – so how do I get there, with which tests and how do I interpret these?

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 5

8:15am

Hyperadrenocorticism: How to optimise management
Speakers
avatar for David Church

David Church

David obtained his veterinary degree from The University of Sydney and after graduation and a short spell in practice he was appointed as a small animal clinical instructor at The University of Sydney and then enrolled in a PhD programme in the Faculty of Medicine looking at vari... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central A

8:15am

Feline aspergillosis: An overview
In 2013 Dr Barrs discovered Aspergillus felis in cats from Australia with an aggressive form of upper respiratory tract aspergillosis.  Feline aspergillosis is now recognised as an important fungal infection of cats, and should be on your diagnostic "radar", especially if you are presented with cats with chronic nasal discharge and sneezing, or the more dramatic presentation of a swollen-eye or corneal ulcer from a retrobulbar fungal mass.
In this talk, Vanessa will give a comprehensive overview of feline aspergillosis, much of it based on her own research and clinical experience.  Included will be case-based presentations of feline sino-nasal and sino-orbital aspergillosis, tips for biopsy collection and culture, other diagnostic tests and management options, including topical and systemic anti-fungal drugs.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Barrs

Vanessa Barrs

Head of Small Animal Medicine, University of Sydney
Vanessa Barrs is the Director of the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Head of Small Animal Medicine at the University of Sydney and is a registered Specialist in Feline Medicine. She has served as President of the Feline Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College o... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Arena 1

8:15am

Pearls of the ophthalmic exam
Never were the famous words “More is missed through not seeing than not knowing” more apt than for the ophthalmic exam. While it is undoubtedly important to know how to treat disease, without a diagnosis or with the incorrect diagnosis, treatment is often ineffective or worse. Although historical data may provide essential clues to the diagnosis, ready visualization of almost all parts of the eye means nothing can replace a complete examination. Fortunately, reaching an ophthalmic diagnosis relies almost completely on performing a thorough ophthalmic examination, which can be done with the simplest of instrumentation. In fact, a revealing ophthalmic examination is readily performed with just 4 guidelines, 4 skills, and equipment that is almost certainly already in your clinic.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central B/C

8:15am

Advances in general surgery: Principles and practices
Things change rapidly in veterinary surgery.  This session with discuss current thoughts with regard to the principles and practices following specific topics in small animal soft tissue surgery:  antimicrobial use, nutritional support, gastrointestinal surgery, urinary surgery, and open wound management. 

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 6

8:15am

Advanced anaesthetic monitoring techniques
Monitoring the physiological state of our patients is important when making decisions about the management of the anaesthetic.  Although we are not required to make a diagnosis, it is crucial that we provide the clinician with all the relevant information so that they can make a decision on the treatment options.  Covered will be ECG, blood pressure, carbon dioxide readings and oxygen saturation.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Parkin

Anita Parkin

Anita has been a veterinary nurse for over 20 years.  Joining Veterinary Specialist Services in 2001 working as a medical and surgical nurse.  For the last 10 years specializing as a surgical nurse. In 2013 Anita completed her Diploma in Emergency and Critical Care, recertified in her Diploma in Surgery and was re-accredited through the VNCA (Veterinary Nurses Council of... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 8

9:10am

Bone augmentation: Why and how
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 9

9:10am

Treatment of atopic dermatitis: What if glucocorticoids fail?
Which other medications are available? When and how do we use them? How do we get the owners to comply?

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 5

9:10am

Hypoadrenocorticism: Diagnosis and management in 2017
Speakers
avatar for David Church

David Church

David obtained his veterinary degree from The University of Sydney and after graduation and a short spell in practice he was appointed as a small animal clinical instructor at The University of Sydney and then enrolled in a PhD programme in the Faculty of Medicine looking at vari... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central A

9:10am

Adrenal disease in cats: Getting more than you bargained for
Tumours of the adrenal cortex of cats most commonly secrete cortisol or aldosterone.  The clinical presentations for each are different and easy to distinguish.  But, feline adrenal tumours can produce multiple hormones, including aldosterone and progesterone, or combinations of sex-steroid hormones, resulting in unusual signs.  Syndromes associated with progesterone excess include aggression, diabetes mellitus and meningioma growth.  In this talk, each syndrome will be illustrated with cases diagnosed and managed by the presenter.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Barrs

Vanessa Barrs

Head of Small Animal Medicine, University of Sydney
Vanessa Barrs is the Director of the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Head of Small Animal Medicine at the University of Sydney and is a registered Specialist in Feline Medicine. She has served as President of the Feline Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College o... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Arena 1

9:10am

Technical radiography: Excellence at every stage
Multiple choice question: Select the answer that best relates to this statement. Everyone has access to radiographs in practice - they are easily obtained and give you great information about the disease..

Answer:
a) all of the time: radiography is easy and I have a perfect interpretation every time, dog, cat or bird. 
b) most of the time: if the patient lies still enough and I can find the heart in the thorax I think I am doing pretty well. Cats are hard. 
c) some of the time: I try avoid x-raying the abdomen as it is murkey and grey and I find the lungs hard to read, but dog bones are easy!
d) none of the time: I haven't taken an x-ray in a while, its all way too hard. 

Whatever your answer this presentation on what seems (on the surface) to be a mundane topic will change the way you you approach radiographs by showing you expert tips and tricks for improving the image. When the image is good, the pathology is clear (or clearer). And if its not obvious, at least with quality images you will be able to get a second opinion without fear! 

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Lenard

Zoe Lenard

Veterinary Radiologist, Veterinary Imaging Centre, Perth Vet Specialists
Zoe attended the University of Sydney and obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999. She worked in small animal practice in inner Sydney for 4 years, before moving to Perth, Western Australia. At Murdoch University, Zoe undertook a residency in Diagnostic Imaging (2003-20... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 7

9:10am

The seven colours of corneal pathology
Corneal clarity is essential for normal vision and results from a number of critical anatomical and physiological adaptations. A number of clinically important diseases are associated with a decrease in corneal transparency and one of 7 characteristic & distinctive colour changes.  Learning to recognize and interpret these colour changes and the mechanisms responsible for them provides a simple and logical approach to diagnosis of all corneal and some intraocular diseases. It also facilitates selection of appropriate diagnostic tests. This lecture will introduce this really useful concept using many examples.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central B/C

9:10am

Advances in general surgery: Toys, tools and implants
This session will provide information and case application about new materials and devices being used in veterinary soft tissue surgery from suture material to hemostatic modalities to implanted devices.  Some examples include knotless suture, stapling equipment, vessel-sealing devices, alternative thoracostomy tubes, and devices to manage urinary incontinence and ureteral obstruction.

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 6

9:10am

Blood transfusion medicine
Blood transfusions (feline and canine) are not everyday practice in our veterinary clinics, so it is good to have a quick reference to the important features when a blood transfusion is required.  This lecture will guide you on the collection process, blood typing and cross matching, what is the best product to administer to your patient, how to prepare to administer the product and the monitoring that is required during the transfusion.  Reactions can come in varying degrees, how to deal with these reactions promptly can mean life or death, how to pick up on these reactions and different treatment options will also be addressed.

Speakers
avatar for Anita Parkin

Anita Parkin

Anita has been a veterinary nurse for over 20 years.  Joining Veterinary Specialist Services in 2001 working as a medical and surgical nurse.  For the last 10 years specializing as a surgical nurse. In 2013 Anita completed her Diploma in Emergency and Critical Care, recertified in her Diploma in Surgery and was re-accredited through the VNCA (Veterinary Nurses Council of... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 8

10:00am

Morning tea
Sunday August 13, 2017 10:00am - 10:40am
Exhibition Hall

10:40am

Basic endodontic techniques
Discussion of variations on standard root canal treatment techniques. Case studies and clinical examples will be used to illustrate different instrumentation and obturation techniques used by the author. 
 

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 9

10:40am

MRSP in canine pyoderma: Challenges of diagnosis and treatment
Bacterial pyoderma was predictably responsive to empirical systemic antibiotics in most dogs for many years, although often recurrent unless the underlying primary disease was well managed. Now in many areas of the world including Australia, managing canine pyoderma is much more complex due to methicillin-resistance in causal staphylococcal pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is usually also associated with multi-drug resistance. This session will focus on how to accurately recognise pyoderma, how to know if poorly responsive pyoderma is due to MRSP, and treatment options for MRSP pyoderma.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Vogelnest

Linda Vogelnest

Veterinary Dermatologist, Small Animal Specialist Hospital
I graduated from University of Sydney in 1984, and my journey to becoming a Specialist in Veterinary Dermatology began from a background of over 10 years working in general practice, and an initial desire to understand skin disease better, and provide better outcomes for my patie... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 5

10:40am

Hypercalcaemia in dogs and cats: Diagnosis and treatment
This session will provide a method to allow you to decide when the finding of hypercalcemia should be considered important now or if it is OK to be followed later. The importance for measurement of ionized calcium compared to total calcium will be emphasized. The diagnosis of hypercalcemia of malignancy, primary hyperparathyroidism, and hypervitaminosis-D will be discussed and an overview of idiopathic hypercalcemia in cats will be introduced. Emergency treatment for severe hypercalcemia using IV fluids, furosemide, calcitonin, and bisphosphonates will be reviewed. 

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Chew

Dennis Chew

Dr. Chew is a 1972 graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He did a one-year internship at South Weymouth Veterinary Associates and a two-year residency in internal medicine and nephrology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. He beca... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central A

10:40am

Insights into feline mycobacterial infections
This talk covers all aspects of the various causes of both cutaneous and disseminated mycobacteriosis in cats world-wide. This session will inform attendees of the various clinical presentations, keys to diagnosis of these conditions and effective management, as well as addressing zoonotic issues for both veterinary staff and owners.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn O'Brien

Carolyn O'Brien

Specialist in Feline Medicine, Melbourne Cat Referrals
Carolyn is a registered specialist in feline medicine. She has completed a Masters degree in the epidemiology of cryptococcosis of dogs and cats, and is currently undertaking a PhD in mycobacterial infections. She is actively involved in clinical practice and also the teaching of... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Arena 1

10:40am

Optimising image quality in digital imaging
Practically the entire veterinary profession has installed digital radiography now. (Ok, there are still practices using film, but they are slideing rapidly towards digital conversion in the near future). Running into veterinary colleagues and friends there is always someone talking about their new great system, how many megapixels it has and how fast the processing is. But if I asked you to name the brand of your system and list whether it is CR or DR, could you answer?

Do you even know what CR or DR is? Does it matter whether you know?

Everyone has a flash high-res camera in their phone these days, but the world is not full of amazing photographic images. Whilst you can put a post-processed filter across your photo to make it look like you really were alive in the '70's, there is only so much that the camoflage will help. The same applies to the digital radiograph - fiddling with the greyscale to improve your image is unlikely to create any massive diagnostic revelations. 

What you really need are sensible tips for improving the digital image in the first place. Think of this session like a masterclass on MasterChef - you already know some stuff but you will learn a lot about improving your technique and feel really good about the results.   

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Lenard

Zoe Lenard

Veterinary Radiologist, Veterinary Imaging Centre, Perth Vet Specialists
Zoe attended the University of Sydney and obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999. She worked in small animal practice in inner Sydney for 4 years, before moving to Perth, Western Australia. At Murdoch University, Zoe undertook a residency in Diagnostic Imaging (2003-20... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 7

10:40am

Cataracts and other lens problems
Cataracts are commonly seen in dogs in general practice. They occur less commonly in cats.

With technology for cataract surgery in people being used in dogs, success rates for cataract surgery in dogs have improved.

Cataracts will be discussed, recognising cataracts, when to consider surgery and how to improve the success of surgery. Why cataracts occur and are there any non surgical options that can successfully treat cataracts.

Other lens conditions such as lens luxation with also be covered.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Deykin

Anna Deykin

Brisbane Veterinary Specialist Centre
Anna graduated from Murdoch University in 1986. She worked in a small animal practice in Sydney and in England until 1992, after which she trained in ophthalmology residency programmes in Australia and the USA.  Anna became a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scient... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central B/C

10:40am

Arthritis in small animals: Is there more that we can do?
A discussion of medical management of degenerative joint disease in dogs and cats.
This lecture will focus on the medical management of degenerative joint disease in dogs and cats.  As our patients age and advancements in veterinary medicine extend the length and quality of their lives, management of chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis become increasingly relevant to veterinarians.  The lecture will progress through a review of the importance of degenerative joint disease in our patients, followed by a reivew of current methods of controlling pain associated with arthritis.  Further, the role of nutraceuticals and dietary supplements will be discussed along with the relevant literature.  In association with this the importance of weight control as part of the management programme will be reviewed. Our understanding of the importance of physical therapies in managing osteoarthritis will also be discussed. This field of veterinary medicine has grown significantly in recent years and includes animal physiotherapy, and associated modalities such as therapeutic laser and hydrotherapy. Finally, a reivew of some of the potential future strategies for managing degenerative joint disease including the use of intra-articular therapies such as platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cells.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Fearnside

Stephen Fearnside

Dr Stephen Fearnside graduated from The University of Sydney with Honours in 1995. After working in rural practice for a few years, he completed a surgical internship at The Northern Sydney Veterinary Specialist Centre. In 2000 Steve commenced a Small Animal Surgery Residency in... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 6

10:40am

Chemotherapy: Possibilities and precautions
Chemotherapy is an important part of the treatment of many cancers, and if used appropriately can be a valuable part of medical treatment. The decision whether to proceed with chemotherapy is often emotive and will be based on owner and patient factors, availability of treatment and the disease itself.  The use of chemotherapy drugs in clinical practice has safety implications for staff. Strict adherence to safety precautions must be maintained, including personal protective equipment and the use of specifically designed administration equipment.

Speakers
avatar for Patricia Newton

Patricia Newton

Small Animal Medicine Registrar, Brisbane Veterinary Specialist Centre
Patricia is a Small Animal Medicine Registrar at Brisbane Veterinary Specialist Centre and is working toward Fellowship examination. She graduated from UQ in 1999 and worked in small animal general practice in both Alice Springs and Townsville before moving into referral practice... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 8

11:35am

Introduction to veterinary prosthodontics: Crown restoration
A presentation outlining basic theory and treatment planning used for full crown restoration in veterinary patients. 

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 9

11:35am

Skin cytology techniques: Maximising value of this vital diagnostic tool
Skin cytology is invaluable for managing skin case effectively, and is the single most helpful tool in dermatology. Tips will be provided for optimising collection and processing techniques for common tests relevant to general practice, including adhesive tape and glass slide impressions, scrapings and squeeze tape impressions, wet preps, trichograms, and fine needle aspirates. Loads of images will help you understand how to quickly and accurately interpret your cytology samples. Learn how to be more confident with your diagnosis of pyoderma and malassezia dermatitis, how to diagnose "ringworm" immediately without having to wait for cultures, when you can rely on your sampling to exclude mites, and when are tests like trichograms useful to perform.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Vogelnest

Linda Vogelnest

Veterinary Dermatologist, Small Animal Specialist Hospital
I graduated from University of Sydney in 1984, and my journey to becoming a Specialist in Veterinary Dermatology began from a background of over 10 years working in general practice, and an initial desire to understand skin disease better, and provide better outcomes for my patie... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 5

11:35am

Idiopathic hypercalcaemia in cats
This session will provide a detail approach to diagnosis and management of idiopathic hypercalcemia in cats. What does it minimally take to make the diagnosis versus an iron clad diagnosis will be discussed.  Treatment with diet, prednisolone, and alendronate will be disucssed in detail using an actual case followed over 1 year. 

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Chew

Dennis Chew

Dr. Chew is a 1972 graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He did a one-year internship at South Weymouth Veterinary Associates and a two-year residency in internal medicine and nephrology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. He beca... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central A

11:35am

Feline geriatrics
Feline patients are living longer and mostly healthier lives. This session will cover key aspects of how to keep geriatric cats in top shape, including practice wellness programs, anaesthesia, juggling concurrent disease conditions, chronic pain management, nutrition as well as a host of specific problems of aging.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn O'Brien

Carolyn O'Brien

Specialist in Feline Medicine, Melbourne Cat Referrals
Carolyn is a registered specialist in feline medicine. She has completed a Masters degree in the epidemiology of cryptococcosis of dogs and cats, and is currently undertaking a PhD in mycobacterial infections. She is actively involved in clinical practice and also the teaching of... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Arena 1

11:35am

Thoracic radiology: The pulmonary parenchyma
Radiology of the pulmonary parenchyma can be challenging but if you approach the interpretation of thoracic radiographs logically and with a strategy it can be very rewarding. During this session, Cathy will introduce her strategy for interpreting the pulmonary parenchmya. This session is intended to give you confidence in the interpretation of thoracic radiographs and hopefully "the love" of the thoracic radiograph.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Beck

Cathy Beck

Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne
Cathy graduated from the University of Sydney in 1992 and then spent 2 years working in mixed animal practice in Australia and the UK. Cathy returned to the University of Sydney in 1995 and completed a Mixed Animal Internship, gaining a Diploma of Veterinary Clinical Studies. It... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 7

11:35am

Surgery of the eyelids and third eyelid
Many breeds, particularly large breed dogs have poor eyelid conformation.

Poor eyelid conformation can lead to chronic irritation, discomfort and poor vision.

Several surgical techniques for entropion, ectropion and overgrown palpebral fissures will be discussed.

Treatment of other eyelid abnormalities will also be covered including conditions and surgery involving the third eyelid.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Deykin

Anna Deykin

Brisbane Veterinary Specialist Centre
Anna graduated from Murdoch University in 1986. She worked in a small animal practice in Sydney and in England until 1992, after which she trained in ophthalmology residency programmes in Australia and the USA.  Anna became a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scient... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central B/C

11:35am

Canine arthroscopy: Is it worth the effort?
A discussion of the value of arthroscopy in assessing and treating canine joint diseases.
Arthroscopy is now well established for the investigation and treatment of many joint conditions in dogs.  A wide range of scoping equipment options are now available to the practitioner with improvements in optics and digital technology allowing exceptional image quality to be obtained.   This lecture will review the techniques and advances in canine arthroscopic treatment for joint disease of the shoulder, elbow, stifle, hock and hip. It will cover the relevant equipment required to perform arthroscopy and review the procedures and value of arthroscopy for assessment and treatment of common joint disorder of the dog. A closer examination of the advantages of arthroscopy relative to other options for joint surgery will be had with consideration to the available literature. With increasing numbers of veterinarians performing stifle arthroscopy as part of the management for cranial cruciate ligament disease, focus will be given to the stifle and the role of arthroscopy in evaluating the cruciate ligament and in assessing the medial meniscus. 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Fearnside

Stephen Fearnside

Dr Stephen Fearnside graduated from The University of Sydney with Honours in 1995. After working in rural practice for a few years, he completed a surgical internship at The Northern Sydney Veterinary Specialist Centre. In 2000 Steve commenced a Small Animal Surgery Residency in... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 6

11:35am

Hypotension and hypothermia under anaesthesia
Hypotension and hypothermia commonly occur in anaesthetised patients. Both of these abnormalities can have negative consequences for the patients during anaesthesia and can also affect post-operative recovery as well.   Veterinary nurses and technicians thorough understanding of the causes and treatments of hypotension and hypothermia will allow them to respond accordingly to these abnormalities.

Speakers
avatar for Tinika Gillespie

Tinika Gillespie

Tinika Graduated from UNITEC 2001(NZ) with a Diploma in Veterinary Nursing. In 2002 -2005 she worked in the UK and Canada in referral, emergency and primary practices. Since then she has worked intermittently for UQ as a tutor and a veterinary nurse with a brief stint in Dublin... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 8

12:25pm

Lunch
Sunday August 13, 2017 12:25pm - 1:25pm
Exhibition Hall

1:25pm

How composites work
This session will review the generations and types of composites and the science behind their use.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 9

1:25pm

Practical diagnosis of canine papules and pustules
Which clinical scenarios raise a red flag? Are there acceptable shortcuts – or must clinicians always follow a diagnostic algorithm?  

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:25pm

PU/PD: When the blood and urine tests are normal-ish
There are over two dozen causes of PU/PD - many are relatively easily diagnosed with history collection, physical examination and routine blood and urine tests.  However when these tests provide no obvious clues we are left with a handful of differentials that can be challenging to diagnose and this group of diseases is the focus of this presentation. 

Speakers
avatar for Darren Merrett

Darren Merrett

Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre
Darren has spent over 23 years in specialist clinical practice; on behalf of the Centre for Veterinary Education he has been a co-tutor for a internal medicine distance education for 20 years; in addition he has mentored and examined many, many veterinarians for the Australian an... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central A

1:25pm

Dealing with dermatophytes
Dermatophytosis or ringworm is a common infection of young cats and often of great concern to cat-owners and to breeders.  The aim of this talk is to equip you to be confident to accurately diagnose these infections in-house, effectively treat them using drugs for which you are aware of and comfortable with safety and toxicity profiles, and to provide accurate and up-to-date knowledge about the disease for cat-owners including zoonotic risks and effective environmental decontamination procedures.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Barrs

Vanessa Barrs

Head of Small Animal Medicine, University of Sydney
Vanessa Barrs is the Director of the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Head of Small Animal Medicine at the University of Sydney and is a registered Specialist in Feline Medicine. She has served as President of the Feline Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College o... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Arena 1

1:25pm

Thoracic radiology: The cardiovascular structures
The cardiovascular structures are commonly misinterpreted on a thoracic radiographs. This session will give you tips and tricks to ensure the correct interpretation of the heart and pulmonary vascular structures.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Beck

Cathy Beck

Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne
Cathy graduated from the University of Sydney in 1992 and then spent 2 years working in mixed animal practice in Australia and the UK. Cathy returned to the University of Sydney in 1995 and completed a Mixed Animal Internship, gaining a Diploma of Veterinary Clinical Studies. It... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 7

1:25pm

Ocular signs of systemic disease
The eye is a privileged site protected by a blood-ocular barrier.  Systemic diseases may cause disruption to this barrier and affect the eye leading to clinical signs often similar to uveitis. Usually both eyes are affected and it is important to rule out local causes of uveitis in trying to obtain a diagnosis. An ophthalmic exam can be important in esatablishing underlying systemic disease. This lecture provides an overview of systemic diseases that can affect the eye, including immune-mediated syndromes, infectious agents, neoplasia and vascular abnormalities

Speakers
avatar for Mark Billson

Mark Billson

Mark graduated from the University of Sydney, Australia in 1990. He developed an early interest in ophthalmology and undertook a PhD at the University of Sydney into Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis, which was awarded in 1996. Following this, Mark moved to Glasgow Universit... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central B/C

1:25pm

Minimally invasive surgery for the practitioner
Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is a rapidly growing field in veterinary medicine and is reaching into the general practice setting, particularly for laparoscopy.  Laparoscopic techniques commonly performed by the veterinary practitioner and discussed in this lecture include ovariectomy, ovariohysterectomy, cryptorchidectomy, liver biopsy, gastropexy, and cystotomy.  

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 6

1:25pm

Mechanical ventilation and nursing care
With the advent of mechanical ventilation we are able to treat respiratory compromised patients who previously we maybe could not treat.   While we have much success within the ICU with mechanically ventilating patients, it is not a benign form of treatment and extreme care must be taken to help facilitate a successful outcome.   Understanding the basics of the mechanics of ventilating and how to perform essential nursing care is discussed in this lecture with the aim to drastically reduce iatrogenic complications; which ultimately increases hospital time for the patient with the potential for a less favorable outcome.
 

Speakers
LP

Lisa Partel

Nurse Trainer, University of Sydney Teaching Hospital
Lisa has worked as a veterinary nurse for the last 15 years, starting out in general practice where she obtained her Cert IV in Veterinary Nursing. She moved on after 6 years to work in a specialist referral hospital in Brisbane where she worked in all aspects of referral medicine including anaesthesia/surgery, internal medicine and ICU. During this time she obtained Veterinary Technician Specialist in Emergency... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 8

2:20pm

Feeding tubes
This  session will review the placement and maintenance of nasoeosophageal, nasogastric, eosophageal and gastric feeding tubes.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 9

2:20pm

Pododermatitis in dogs and cats
Clinical diagnostic clues and updates in medical management, with special emphasis on interdigital dermatitis.

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 5

2:20pm

Canine hypothyroidism
Canine hypothyroidism is a considerable diagnostic challenge that often requires sifting the evidence from many sources and making a weighted judgement.   We will explore the sources of evidence available to the clinician and discuss their interpretation.  

Speakers
avatar for Darren Merrett

Darren Merrett

Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre
Darren has spent over 23 years in specialist clinical practice; on behalf of the Centre for Veterinary Education he has been a co-tutor for a internal medicine distance education for 20 years; in addition he has mentored and examined many, many veterinarians for the Australian an... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central A

2:20pm

Feline idiopathic cystitis: Urological, neurological or psychological?
Knowledge surrounding the aetiology of Feline Idiopathic Cystitis has significantly advanced in recent years; in most cases the condition is likely to be multifactorial and involving complex interactions between the urinary tract, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and central nervous system. This lecture will begin by summarising the most recent information regarding aetiopathogensis, and relating this to best practice management.  Give the multi-factorial nature of the condition,  effective management also needs to comprise a multi-modal approach including multi-modal environmental modification, addressing underlying stressors, increasing water intake, and analgesia in addition to potentially other pharmacological treatments. The lecture will go through the latest recommendations for managing these challenging cases, and have a particular focus on what constitutes stress in these cats, how do we recognise it, and how do we address it to achieve effective long term management. 

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Harvey

Andrea Harvey

Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine
Andrea Harvey is a UK trained feline Specialist that moved to Australia in 2011 after running the world renowned Feline Centre clinic at the University of Bristol (UK) for 5 years. She gained RCVS and European Diplomas in feline and internal medicine in 2005. Andrea has had a lon... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Arena 1

2:20pm

Thoracic radiology: Interactive cases
Don't be scared!  You won't be asked to interpret radiographs in front of everyone, there is no need to hide. This session is designed to reinforce the principles discussed in the previous sessions on thoracic radiology. You will be able to view the cases on your iphone, ipad or computer and then interact with the session anonymously. The cases are selected to represent common thoracic conditions and the process of interpreting these cases will be make very visual so that you can enjoy the process. This session will increase your confidence in thoracic radiology.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Beck

Cathy Beck

Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne
Cathy graduated from the University of Sydney in 1992 and then spent 2 years working in mixed animal practice in Australia and the UK. Cathy returned to the University of Sydney in 1995 and completed a Mixed Animal Internship, gaining a Diploma of Veterinary Clinical Studies. It... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 7

2:20pm

Neuro-ophthalmology
Neuro-ophthalmology encompasses disorders of vision, pupillary motility/size, movement of the eyelids and globe and lacrimation. A complete ophthalmic exam will incorporate assessent of several cranial nerves and this lecture will help you to understand how to test these nerves and better perform a neuro-ophthalmologic assessment. In addition, we will discuss how to interpret the findings to establish a list of differential diagnoses and provide examples of diseases with neurological involvement and their clinical signs.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Billson

Mark Billson

Mark graduated from the University of Sydney, Australia in 1990. He developed an early interest in ophthalmology and undertook a PhD at the University of Sydney into Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis, which was awarded in 1996. Following this, Mark moved to Glasgow Universit... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central B/C

2:20pm

Complex fracture management
A discussion of challenging fractures with approaches to planning and management reviewed.
The veterinary orthopaedist is often faced with the “nightmare” fracture scenario. Most of us can recall in great detail, horrendous fractures that have challenged us. This forum will be an attempt to share some of those challenges, the strategies that were used to overcome them and what was learned in the process. The focus will be a case based review of ways to plan and manage the complex fracture, particularly those with complicating features such as joint involvement, loss of soft tissue envelope or being open. There are many options now available to the orthopod to manage such fractures and often surgeon preference and experience are the guiding influences for choice of fracture repair. New methods and technologies have evolved over the past several decades and every surgeon has their preference depending on the situation.  The various advantages and disadvantages of each option for management will be reviewed including locking plate technology which has more recently been added to the arsenal of implant strategies to manage the complex fracture.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Fearnside

Stephen Fearnside

Dr Stephen Fearnside graduated from The University of Sydney with Honours in 1995. After working in rural practice for a few years, he completed a surgical internship at The Northern Sydney Veterinary Specialist Centre. In 2000 Steve commenced a Small Animal Surgery Residency in... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 6

2:20pm

Surgical pain management
Effective pain management is an essential component in the care of the surgical patient.  Inadequate pain management has obvious deleterious consequences for the patient and caregiver and also may result in increased morbidity and mortality.  Effective pain management can be a complex process and the use of multimodal or balanced analgesia should be routine practice with every surgical patient.  Veterinary nurses and technicians play a pivotal role in patient care and should be the advocate with recognition, assessment and treatment of pain in the surgical patient.

Speakers
avatar for Trish Farry

Trish Farry

Trish Farry is an certified nurse with specialist qualifications in Emergency/Critical Care and Anaesthesia/Analgesia.  She is an Associate Lecturer and clinical instructor in anaesthesia, within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, and co-coordinates the final year of Bachelor of Veterinary Technology... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 8

3:10pm

Afternoon tea
Sunday August 13, 2017 3:10pm - 3:50pm
Exhibition Hall

3:50pm

Dental homecare: Does it work and where is the evidence?
Homecare refers to those procedures that owners can perform at home to retard the accumulation of dental plaque (or calculus) and thus prevent or at least control periodontal disease.

Homecare is an integral part of the professional dental clean, because without it, the plaque and calculus will quickly reform. However, it seems like every few weeks, veterinarians as well as pet owners are offered a new home care product that makes claims about plaque and/or calculus reduction that doesn’t seem to be backed up with any strong evidence. Supermarkets are often filled with an array of homecare products which make all sorts of claims, with some of the claims being misleading.

This lecture will look at the types of homecare products available in the market today. An assessment of each homecare product will be made based on what evidence is available to back up any claims made.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, James Cook University
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Curren... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 9

3:50pm

All you wanted to know about dermatophytes
This lecture answers practical questions such as: use and interpretion of lab tests?  How important is environmental management? 

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 5

3:50pm

Diabetes mellitus: What’s new and important in 2017 Part I
Speakers
avatar for David Church

David Church

David obtained his veterinary degree from The University of Sydney and after graduation and a short spell in practice he was appointed as a small animal clinical instructor at The University of Sydney and then enrolled in a PhD programme in the Faculty of Medicine looking at vari... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central A

3:50pm

Management of feline hyperthyroidism: What's new?
Hyperthyroidism is well recognised to be the most common feline endocrinopathy encountered in clinical practice. Whilst most practitioners have vast experience in treating these cases, recently new treatments and new insights into treatment have become available. Furthermore, although the majority of cases may be straightforward to diagnose and treat, there are also many cases that prove to be much more challenging. It is important that the clinician recognises the potential difficulties in management, and the complications that may arise, to enable owners to be well informed and involved in the decision making as to the most appropriate treatment option for their cat.  Emerging evidence has also led to changes in some of the recommendations for the treatment of feline hyperthyroidism, and it is critical for practitioners to keep up to date.  This lecture aims to give an update on new information published on the management of hyperthyroidism over the last couple of years and an evidenced based approach to best practice in managing this common disease. 

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Harvey

Andrea Harvey

Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine
Andrea Harvey is a UK trained feline Specialist that moved to Australia in 2011 after running the world renowned Feline Centre clinic at the University of Bristol (UK) for 5 years. She gained RCVS and European Diplomas in feline and internal medicine in 2005. Andrea has had a lon... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Arena 1

3:50pm

Imaging round cell neoplasia in the cat: A close look at ultrasound
 Lymphoma shows diversity in its morphology and behavior in the cat, despite being one of the most common cancers affecting this species. Imaging is required to assist with accurate staging of the disease and ultrasound using a high frequency transducer will allow staging of many forms of the disease. This presentation will focus on how round cell neoplasia (lymphoma and others) looks on ultraound in the cat, focussing mostly on the abdomen with some reference to the thorax. 

Attendees will see an image-rich presentation that highlights the different appearances of lymphoma and learn about the speaker's approach to diagnostics for these cases.  

In particular, a clear review of the latest imaging for intestinal lymphoma will be presented. Understanding the typical imaging appearance of high grade and low grade alimentary lymphoma will help clinicians to select the best sampling method (needle aspirates or biopsy). No imaging features of lymphoma are pathognomonic and the presentation will also discuss other differentials (neoplastic and non-neoplastic) that may appear similar to the imaging features of lymphoma. 

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Lenard

Zoe Lenard

Veterinary Radiologist, Veterinary Imaging Centre, Perth Vet Specialists
Zoe attended the University of Sydney and obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999. She worked in small animal practice in inner Sydney for 4 years, before moving to Perth, Western Australia. At Murdoch University, Zoe undertook a residency in Diagnostic Imaging (2003-20... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 7

3:50pm

Breed approach to ophthalmology
There are now so many different breeds of dogs and many of them have inherited eye disease. This forms a large part of ophthalmology practice.

By knowing what conditions occur in what breeds, diagnosis of ophthalmic conditions can be much easier.

In this session, we will go through the common conditions that occur in different breeds.

Hereditability will be discussed and also the ACES eye scheme for examining pedigreed dogs for inherited eye conditions will be explained.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Deykin

Anna Deykin

Brisbane Veterinary Specialist Centre
Anna graduated from Murdoch University in 1986. She worked in a small animal practice in Sydney and in England until 1992, after which she trained in ophthalmology residency programmes in Australia and the USA.  Anna became a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Scient... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central B/C

3:50pm

New approaches and methods in external fixation for long bone fractures
The presentation will review concepts and methods of application of external fixation for the treatment of fractures.   It will explore the evolution of these concepts with advances in technology and clinical practice.  It will include a discussion of newer frame configurations including ring and hybrid ring frames.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Beck

Jason Beck

Specialist Surgeon, Qld Veterinary Specialists
All aspects of small animal soft tissue, orthopaedic and neurosurgery


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 6

3:50pm

What RECOVER has taught us
The Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) was instigated to develop a set of clinical guidelines for the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cats and dogs.  A major factor cited for historically poor outcomes in CPR has been the lack of standardised training or guidelines.  Over 1000 pieces of literature were appraised by more than 100 veterinary Specialists to establish consensus evidence-based guidelines for CPR in cats and dogs.

Speakers
avatar for Trish Farry

Trish Farry

Trish Farry is an certified nurse with specialist qualifications in Emergency/Critical Care and Anaesthesia/Analgesia.  She is an Associate Lecturer and clinical instructor in anaesthesia, within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, and co-coordinates the final year of Bachelor of Veterinary Technology... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 8

4:45pm

When should we use antimicrobials in dentistry?
Antimicrobial usage when dealing with periodontal disease and other oral pathology always raises much debate amongst the veterinary fraternity. This lecture will look at the aetiopathogenesis of common oral diseases with particular attention to periodontal disease and when it is considered appropriate to use antimicrobials during the medical/surgical management of these oral diseases.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, James Cook University
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Curren... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 9

4:45pm

Demodicosis in small animal practice
Have new diagnostic tests and treatments revolutionized the management of demodicosis? Will demodicosis become irrelevant?

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 5

4:45pm

Diabetes mellitus: What’s new and important in 2017 Part II
Speakers
avatar for David Church

David Church

David obtained his veterinary degree from The University of Sydney and after graduation and a short spell in practice he was appointed as a small animal clinical instructor at The University of Sydney and then enrolled in a PhD programme in the Faculty of Medicine looking at vari... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central A

4:45pm

Approach to the jaundiced cat
Jaundice is a relatively common presenting problem in clinical practice, but can be caused by a wide number of different diseases, that are often challenging to diagnose. Jaundiced cats are frequently very unwell and rapid decision making can be required to achieve the best outcome.  A logical and systematic approach is needed to make the best diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, using techniques of both problem solving and pattern recognition. This lecture aims to discuss the differential diagnoses for jaundice, highlight how features of the signalment, history, physical examination, laboratory and imaging data can assist in refining those differentials, and provide a logical and practical approach that will enable practitioners to successfully manage even the most complex cases that present with jaundice. 

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Harvey

Andrea Harvey

Registered Specialist in Feline Medicine
Andrea Harvey is a UK trained feline Specialist that moved to Australia in 2011 after running the world renowned Feline Centre clinic at the University of Bristol (UK) for 5 years. She gained RCVS and European Diplomas in feline and internal medicine in 2005. Andrea has had a lon... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Arena 1

4:45pm

CT of the feline head: Why we should skip radiography
The feline head is really, really complicated and radiography is a poor cousin to CT. This dynamic and case-based presentation will demonstrate why radiography is inferior and show plenty of examples of disease where CT markedly changed the approach to the case. We will cover nasal cavity disease, traumatic disease, neoplastic diseases, intracranial diseases, ear disease. We discuss a few importnat technical tips so that anyone with access to CT can get beautiful images. If you like cats and like CT, then this will be a really fun way to spend the end of your Sunday!

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Lenard

Zoe Lenard

Veterinary Radiologist, Veterinary Imaging Centre, Perth Vet Specialists
Zoe attended the University of Sydney and obtained a Bachelor of Veterinary Science in 1999. She worked in small animal practice in inner Sydney for 4 years, before moving to Perth, Western Australia. At Murdoch University, Zoe undertook a residency in Diagnostic Imaging (2003-20... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 7

4:45pm

My approach to non healing ulcers
When an ulcer hasn’t healed at the first recheck, there is a tendency to throw up our arms and become frustrated.  However, a few golden rules can help us to see that ulcers within this group have actually helped us out in some ways by identifying themselves as “complicated ulcers” with only one of only 3 causes still possible in dogs and one of only 2 causes possible in cats . In this discussion we will go through these golden rules and provide a logical approach to turning these potentially frustrating cases into medical success stories.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Central B/C

4:45pm

Intervertebral disc disease: The best ways to diagnose and treat
This presentation will discuss the methods of diagnosing disc disease.   This will include the:  clinical signs; neurological examination and imaging methods.  Including a comparison of plain radiographs, myelography,  CT,  CT myelography and high and low field MRI.   The discussion of treatment will be limited to a discussion of conservative management  and the indications for and the methods of surgical treatment of type 1 disc prolapse in the thoraco-lumbar spine.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Beck

Jason Beck

Specialist Surgeon, Qld Veterinary Specialists
All aspects of small animal soft tissue, orthopaedic and neurosurgery


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 6

4:45pm

The road to becoming a veterinary technician specialist
Due to a growing interest amongst veterinary technicians and nurses to attain an advanced level of knowledge, skills and certification in a particular field, the first veterinary technician specialist (VTS) academy was formed in 1996.  In 2016 there are now 12 recognised specialist academies with over 750 technicians designated VTS’s.   Each Academy develops pathways through application and examination in which a candidate must demonstrate advanced skills and knowledge in order to be awarded the designation of Veterinary Technician Specialist.

Speakers
avatar for Trish Farry

Trish Farry

Trish Farry is an certified nurse with specialist qualifications in Emergency/Critical Care and Anaesthesia/Analgesia.  She is an Associate Lecturer and clinical instructor in anaesthesia, within the School of Veterinary Science at The University of Queensland, and co-coordinates the final year of Bachelor of Veterinary Technology... Read More →


Sunday August 13, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 8

7:00pm

Gala Awards Dinner
Dress to impress as we honour the highest achievers of the small animal profession and celebrate the success of the 2017 FASAVA Congress. Includes 3 course sit down dinner, drinks and entertainment. An evening not to be missed.

Sponsors
avatar for Hill's Pet Nutrition

Hill's Pet Nutrition

Prime Sponsor


Sunday August 13, 2017 7:00pm - 11:30pm
Arena 2
 
Monday, August 14
 

8:15am

Surgical management of palatal defects
This lecture will look at the surgical techniques that are currently available for the repair of acquired (traumatic) palatal defects. Two of the more common techniques for traumatic palatal defects such as Von Langenbeck’s palatoplasty and the overlapping flap technique will be discussed. The lecture will also look at some of the more advanced treatments that one can consider for larger palatal defects. 

Speakers
avatar for Tony Caiafa

Tony Caiafa

Veterinary Dentist, James Cook University
Graduated University of Melbourne BVSc 1978 Graduated Dux of class University of melbourne BDSc 1998 MANCVS Small animal surgery, Small animal dentistry and oral surgery Lectured, authored many times in the field of Veterinary dentistry both within Australia and worldwide. Curren... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 9

8:15am

My clinical approach to the alopecic patient
Which clinical clues can help, which tests are essential and some new tips on management.

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Arena 1

8:15am

Infectious causes of diarrhoea in cats: Diagnosis
In this session, we will use a case-based approach to lead into a discussion of the most common infectious causes of diarrhea in cats.   Emphasis will be placed on optimal diagnostic procedures and treatments.   Organisms discussed include Clostridium spp., Salmonella spp., Giardia spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Tritrichomonas blagburi (foetus), Cystoisospora spp., Toxocara cati, and more!

Speakers
avatar for Michael Lappin

Michael Lappin

Professor, Colorado State University
Dr. Lappin graduated from Oklahoma State University and then completed an internship, internal medicine residency, and PhD program in Parasitology at the University of Georgia. Dr. Lappin is the Kenneth W. Smith Professor in Small Animal Clinical Veterinary Medicine at Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 5

8:15am

The patient's eye is red, now what?
Hyperaemia of the surface of the globe or so-called “red-eye” is not only one of the most common reasons for a client presenting their animal for veterinary care, but potentially one of the most  critical.  As veterinary ophthalmologists, some of the most worrisome cases we see are those were ocular redness was misinterpreted as allergic conjunctivitis or “he must have got some dust in his eye” and thereby serious and potentially blinding diseases such as uveitis, glaucoma, dry eye, or ulcerative keratitis were missed. The goal of this lecture is to heighten awareness of the differential diagnoses that may cause ocular hyperaemia and to define methods to differentiate these.  We will look at eyes with conjunctivitis, keratitis, uveitis, glaucoma, and orbital disease.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central B/C

8:15am

Controversies in gastric dilation-volvulus syndrome
Dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus syndrome (GDV) require immediate medical and surgical care to improve the odds of survival.  Numerous controversies exist regarding risk factors, initial management, diagnostics, surgical procedures, and prognosis.  This session will address these topics with reference to the most current information in the literature. 

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 6

8:15am

Chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats I: Staging and initial management
Confirmation of the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease will be discussed and the concept of staging CKD according to the IRIS scheme will be reviewed.  Factors operative in the progressive loss of renal functions will be provided. New information on the use of SDMA as a surrogate for GFR will be reviewed. “Kidney-friendly” diets extend the life of both dogs and cats.  Dietary treatment will emphasize the role for dietary phosphorus restriction.  Adverse effects of too much protein restriction will be noted. The importance for the use of oral intestinal phosphorus binders will be emphasized in the quest to achieve a targeted level of total body phosphorus control based on serum Pi in the middle part of the reference range.

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Chew

Dennis Chew

Dr. Chew is a 1972 graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He did a one-year internship at South Weymouth Veterinary Associates and a two-year residency in internal medicine and nephrology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. He beca... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Central A

9:10am

Haematology: Maximising the yield from the results
The session will cover the approach to interpreting the complete blood count - a commonly performed test, but also one that can cause some stress.  This session will break down the interpretation into three parts - the red cells, white cells and platelets.  Case examples will be used to illustrate the interpretation.

Speakers
avatar for Graham Swinney

Graham Swinney

Scientific convenor, FASAVA Congress, FASAVA C.O.C.
Graham graduated from the University of Sydney in 1987, after which he worked as an Assistant Lecturer in Small Animal Medicine at Massey University. He then undertook a Small Animal Medicine Residency at the University of Queensland in 1991. In 1993 Graham assumed a role as a Re... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 7

9:10am

Prosthodontics II: Tooth preparation, crown fabrication and cementation
A discussion of clinical techniques and materials used in crown preparation, cementation and crown fabrication. 

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 9

9:10am

Do dermatologists still use cortisone?
With all the new medications available – is cortisone obsolete? The practical and specific pros and cons will be discussed.  

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Arena 1

9:10am

Infectious causes of diarrhoea in cats: Treatment
In this continuation of lecture 1, we will continue to discuss the diagnosis and management of infectious causes of diarrhea in cats.  Clinical use of probiotics and diets in the management of infectious causes of diarrhea in cats will be emphasized and we will discuss what agrent to rule out by tests or treatments before continuing the workup for inflammatory bowel disease.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Lappin

Michael Lappin

Professor, Colorado State University
Dr. Lappin graduated from Oklahoma State University and then completed an internship, internal medicine residency, and PhD program in Parasitology at the University of Georgia. Dr. Lappin is the Kenneth W. Smith Professor in Small Animal Clinical Veterinary Medicine at Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 5

9:10am

Glaucoma in dogs
Glaucoma is not a single disease but a group of disease sharing, as one of their common properties, an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). At its most basic level, glaucoma pathophysiology is relatively easily summarized (“the drain is blocked!”), but the multiple causes of glaucoma and the huge range of drugs to treat it can be daunting.  We will break this topic down into the “3 Glaucoma Questions” and the “3 Stages of Glaucoma” that will allow you to select the best therapy and preserve vision and maintain a comfortable globe for as long as possible.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central B/C

9:10am

Pleural space disease
Air, fluid, or tissue can compromise the pleural space and cause an acute respiratory crisis in small animals. This session will discuss the etiology, recognition, management, and recent advancement in treatment of pleural space disease, specifically with regard to pneumo-, pyo-, and chylothorax, as well as diaphragmatic herniation.  

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 6

9:10am

Chronic kidney disease in dogs and cats II: Control of secondary hyperparathyroidism and progressive renal inflammation
The second session will review the development of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism and how to correct this condition with the use of phosphorus restriction and calcitriol (activated naturally occurring metabolite 1,25(OH)2-cholecalciferol). The emerging concept for the need to supplement parent vitamin D (cholecalciferol) will be introduced. The benefits of prescribing converting enzyme inhibitor treatment (enalapril, benazepril) to prolong renal function and or quality of life will be detailed. The overlapping benefits of dampening the RAAS system with ACE-inhibition and calcitriol will be introduced. The control of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism, progressive renal inflammation, and renal proteinuria will feature treatment with RAAS inhibition (ACE-inhibitors or ARB) and the activated vitamin D metabolite calcitriol (1,25(OH)2-cholecalciferol). A program of diagnostic testing will be proposed to allow safe and effective treatment of CKD.  

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Chew

Dennis Chew

Dr. Chew is a 1972 graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He did a one-year internship at South Weymouth Veterinary Associates and a two-year residency in internal medicine and nephrology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. He beca... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Central A

10:00am

Morning tea
Monday August 14, 2017 10:00am - 10:40am
Exhibition Hall

10:40am

We’re all teachers now I: Thinking and learning styles and their relevance to supporting students in practice
There is now a much greater involvement of private veterinary practices in the education of veterinary students - either through formal arrangements with veterinary schools or less formal work placements/extramural studies. As a result, many more veterinarians have an important role in the clinical and professional development of students. Yet few vets have had any formal training in teaching and learning theory and practice. As we have all experienced, every student is different - in their personality, their clinical interests and focus, their technical skills and their prior practical experiences. These differences are relatively easy to see and understand. What is perhaps less obvious is how they may differ in their learning styles and preferences and how this impacts, not just their approach to formal study, but also their approach to clinical reasoning and problem-solving and how they may react when in a stressful situation.

In this lecture, we will discuss the challenges that practices and students face in clinical placements and some strategies for overcoming these. We will in particular review how learning and thinking style differences can influence our own learning, behaviour and clinical thinking as well as that of our students. Recognising these differences can enrich the teaching and the learning experience, as well as help students, identify how they can strengthen their clinical reasoning skills. The lecture will help you understand yourself and others and will hopefully have resonance, not just in relation to teaching veterinary students, but also team dynamics and personal interactions.         

Speakers
avatar for Jill Maddison

Jill Maddison

Professor of General Practice, The Royal Veterinary College
I am a graduate of the University of Sydney. I completed an internship at the University of Sydney, spent 18 months in full time private practice then completed a residency in small animal medicine at the University of Guelph, Canada. I returned to Australia and completed a PhD e... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 7

10:40am

Dental embryology and tooth development
This presentation will outline normal development in the oral cavity and highlight common problems seen in juveniles resulting from abnormal development. 

Speakers
avatar for Curt Coffman

Curt Coffman

Managing Partner, Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists
Curt Coffman, DVM, FVAD, DAVDCDr. Curt Coffman received his B.S. in agriculture from Kansas State University in 1990 and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Missouri in 1993. Dr. Coffman worked as an Associate and Partner in small animal veterinary practice u... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 9

10:40am

What's new in management of otitis externa and media?
What's new in drug therapies, including compounded options, and new long-acting preparations? What are the common errors for poorly responsive cases? What are the key aspects of effective management plans? Where do ear cleaners fit in? Why is culture and sensitivity testing often not helpful? When should I use systemic treatment? This talk will be packed with useful clinical relevant tips to help answer these questions and more, and allow you to better manage otitis cases in both dogs and cats.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Vogelnest

Linda Vogelnest

Veterinary Dermatologist, Small Animal Specialist Hospital
I graduated from University of Sydney in 1984, and my journey to becoming a Specialist in Veterinary Dermatology began from a background of over 10 years working in general practice, and an initial desire to understand skin disease better, and provide better outcomes for my patie... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Arena 1

10:40am

Infectious causes of cancer in the cat
The identification of cancer-causing viruses bring with it the opportunity for novel treatments that can spare pets from cytotoxic side-effects by targeting the virus or the host’s immune response to it. The ultimate prize for viral-associated cancers is their prevention through screening, education and vaccination to reduce the population at risk. The most widely recognised cause of feline lymphoma, the focus of this session, is feline leukaemia virus (FeLV). Vaccination and changes in management practices have seen the global prevalence of FeLV infection fall and, with it, the incidence of FeLV-related cancers. Remarkably, in the face of this success, the prevalence of lymphoma remains high. This session will give an overview of cancer-causing viruses in the cat and provide an update of research findings on recently discovered gammaherpesvirus of domestic cats, Felis catus gammaherpesvirus 1.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Beatty

Julia Beatty

Professor of Feline Medicine, University of Sydney
Professor Jules Beatty graduated from the Royal Veterinary College, London and worked for the RSPCA before completing a PhD and post-doctoral studies on the immune response to FIV and viral oncogenesis at the University of Glasgow. Jules is a Fellow of the Australia and New Zeala... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 5

10:40am

Surgical management of canine glaucoma
Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive retinal ganglion cell death and optic nerve degeneration and can be devastating for vision. Therapy can be medical and/or surgical and this lecture will discuss the surgical options for managing elevated intraocular pressure. This has typically been via destructive procedures which damage the ciliary body where aqueous is produced but which have ramifications to overall eye health. The other surgical approach involves placement of a device to allow aqueous to bypass the drainage angle. This lecture will discuss these surgeries and give an insight into modifications that have helped improve success rates to better inform you of the options for your patients.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Billson

Mark Billson

Mark graduated from the University of Sydney, Australia in 1990. He developed an early interest in ophthalmology and undertook a PhD at the University of Sydney into Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis, which was awarded in 1996. Following this, Mark moved to Glasgow Universit... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central B/C

10:40am

Rehabilitation of the spinal patient
A discussion of the physical therapy and associated modalities for managing patients with spinal cord injury.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common and potentially devastating condition in veterinary patients. Whilst the ability to restore lost or damaged neurones remains the ultimate goal, surgical and medical advancements over recent decades have meant improvements in survival, function and quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury. Central to these advancements has been a greater understanding of rehabilitation and the role it plays in recovery after SCI.  This lecture will review the common spinal conditions veterinarians are presented with in practice and the ways in which rehabilitation therapy is integrated into the management process.  Therapy programmes are instituted based on the level, nature and severity of the injury, and once co-morbidities and required surgical treatments are addressed.  Patients may be severely incapacitated and the process for recovery may take several weeks or months. Therapy involves integration of appropriate pain management, nursing care, physiotherapy and client communication and support. Managing such patients can be amongst the most rewarding experiences for the veterinarian and rehabilitation therapist. 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Fearnside

Stephen Fearnside

Dr Stephen Fearnside graduated from The University of Sydney with Honours in 1995. After working in rural practice for a few years, he completed a surgical internship at The Northern Sydney Veterinary Specialist Centre. In 2000 Steve commenced a Small Animal Surgery Residency in... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 6

10:40am

Acute kidney injury: Not just dialysis
Acute kidney injury is often life-threatening and the prognosis can be poor.  Renal replacement therapy (dialysis) can significantly improve the outcome of patients treated early where facilites and client financial capacity permit.  However, most veterianrians are faced with managing these patients without the benefit of dialysis.  Well managed fluid and electrolyte imbalances in patients with AKI can optimize the possibility of a positive outcome.  

Speakers
avatar for David Senior

David Senior

Veterinary Consultant
I graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1969 (BVSc) and after one year in a rotating clinical internship, worked in a predominantly dairy/beef practice in Alberta, Canada for four and a half years, then completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at the Univer... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Central A

11:35am

We’re all teachers now II: Using and teaching problem based clinical reasoning skills in practice
Veterinarians must make rapid decisions every day about diagnostic and treatment options for their patients. Clinical reasoning skills form the cornerstone of those decisions as well as a sound and appropriate (to the case) knowledge base. The latter also must include an understanding of important pathophysiological principles relevant to the patient’s clinical problem. However, knowing the facts is not the same as knowing what to do. Knowledge is only useful if it can be accessed, formulated and applied to the problem at hand.
Clinical reasoning is a complex process that varies enormously depending on the clinician’s preferred thinking and learning styles (of which they are often unaware), their past experiences and expertise, the clinical problem itself and the context in which that problem is encountered. In this lecture we will explore different approaches that can be used for solving clinical problems and how they may be taught and/or supported.  The strengths and weaknesses of nonanalytic reason or pattern recognition vs analytic reasoning processes such as inductive problem solving will be reviewed with the aim to assist experienced veterinarians to communicate their clinical reasoning processes to students and recent graduates. The importance of problem-based reasoning and reflective practice and how to support students and recent graduates to develop the skills to do so will also be discussed.  
 

Speakers
avatar for Jill Maddison

Jill Maddison

Professor of General Practice, The Royal Veterinary College
I am a graduate of the University of Sydney. I completed an internship at the University of Sydney, spent 18 months in full time private practice then completed a residency in small animal medicine at the University of Guelph, Canada. I returned to Australia and completed a PhD e... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 7

11:35am

Oronasal fistula repair and selected palatal surgeries
Surgical techniques for single and double flap oronasal fistula repair will be reviewed. Various surgical techniques for repair of palatal defects will also be covered.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 9

11:35am

How to get the most out of a skin biopsy
Simple, practical techniques will be shared which may make the difference between “chronic dermatitis” and “a definitive” diagnosis.

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Arena 1

11:35am

Parvovirus infections in cats: Old and new
Feline panleukopenia virus is one of the oldest viruses to be documented in cats.  With widespread availability of effective vaccines, feline panleukopenia all-but disappeared from companion animal practice between the mid-1970s until recently.  In 2014 two major outbreaks of panleukopenia emerged among shelter cats in Australia.  Because of the widespread practice of fostering of shelter-cats and shelter-cat adoptions, this is a disease that feline practitioners in Australia are likely to encounter.  Similar outbreaks have occurred recently in Europe, the US and Asia.
Cats are also susceptible to infection with Canine Parvovirus (CPV), after which they can shed CPV in their faeces for many weeks.  The ability of CPV to infect cats and the potential for cats to act as reservoirs of infection of CPV for dogs has implications for practice biosecurity and isolation procedures.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa Barrs

Vanessa Barrs

Head of Small Animal Medicine, University of Sydney
Vanessa Barrs is the Director of the University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Head of Small Animal Medicine at the University of Sydney and is a registered Specialist in Feline Medicine. She has served as President of the Feline Chapter of the Australian and New Zealand College o... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 5

11:35am

Ocular neoplasia
Intraocular neoplasms are relatively uncommon in dogs and cats.  However a tumour should be considered in an unexplained red or cloudy eye or in an eye presenting with glaucoma, particularly in breeds not predisposed to primary glaucoma.  Tumours in the eye can originate from ocular tissues or be the result of metastasis from distant sites. This lecture will discuss the clinical signs which should alert you to the possible presence of neoplasia and options for treatment as well as prognosis.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Billson

Mark Billson

Mark graduated from the University of Sydney, Australia in 1990. He developed an early interest in ophthalmology and undertook a PhD at the University of Sydney into Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis, which was awarded in 1996. Following this, Mark moved to Glasgow Universit... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central B/C

11:35am

Advances in open wound management
A discussion on wound assessment and decision making for wound management.
Wounds may occur in many different scenarios in clinical practice and the steps involved in initial patient and wound management will vary considerably. Wounds need to be evaluated as part of a whole patient assessment. Initially, wound cleansing is performed along with application of a temporary wound dressing. Lavage is a very important component in the establishment of a healthy, clean wound. The choice of lavage fluid is an important consideration which will be discussed. Debridement is the process of removing devitalised tissue to convert the wound into one which is clean and sufficiently viable in order to achieve healing. The importance, timing and strategies for debridement of wounds is discussed. Dressings play an important role in the management of the open wound. They protect the wound from desiccation, self-trauma and environmental pathogens and contaminants, as well as providing greater support and warmth to the healing tissues.  They also play a role in debridement and management wound exudates. The choice of dressings for the various stages of healing is an important consideration. A controversial and often misused treatment in the management of open wounds is the use of antimicrobial agents. Appropriate use of these agents will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Fearnside

Stephen Fearnside

Dr Stephen Fearnside graduated from The University of Sydney with Honours in 1995. After working in rural practice for a few years, he completed a surgical internship at The Northern Sydney Veterinary Specialist Centre. In 2000 Steve commenced a Small Animal Surgery Residency in... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 6

11:35am

Proteinuria: Manageable or a death sentence
With the current sensitive methods to measure protein in urine, studies indicate that even mild proteinuria may impact long-term survival in cats.  Further, proteinuria has been implicated as a cause of progression of chronic kidney disease in both dogs and cats.  Detection of proteinuria should trigger a sytematic investigation of the cause so that progressive renal damage is attenuated.

Speakers
avatar for David Senior

David Senior

Veterinary Consultant
I graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1969 (BVSc) and after one year in a rotating clinical internship, worked in a predominantly dairy/beef practice in Alberta, Canada for four and a half years, then completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at the Univer... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Central A

12:25pm

Lunch
Monday August 14, 2017 12:25pm - 1:25pm
Exhibition Hall

1:25pm

What does a positive test mean?
We do routine tests every day in house (and at the laboratory). We get a positive test result and we accept it as being correct but should we? Using FIV and FeLV as examples, this session will help you know whether a positive test is really positive or a false positive

Speakers
avatar for Sue Foster

Sue Foster

Adjunct Associate Professor, Small Animal Medicine, Sue Foster
Small animal medicine, particularly feline medicine, canine hyperadrenocorticism and clinical aspects of clinical pathology testing.


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 7

1:25pm

Vital pulpotomy
Indications for vital pulp therapy will be reviewed. Proper techniques will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Barthel

Ruth Barthel

Owner, Grass Lake Animal Hospital
Dr Ruth Barthel is a 1981 graduate of the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. She became a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry in 1996 and a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College in 2010. She presently practices general medicine and d... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 9

1:25pm

The treatment of feline allergic dermatitis
Feline pruritus can be frustrating and cats tricky to manage – my approach to the medical management of feline allergies.

Speakers
avatar for Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay

Sonya Bettenay graduated with an honours degree in Veterinary Science from the University of Melbourne. She obtained her Membership in Feline Medicine with the ANZCVS in the mid 80‘s and her Fellowship in Dermatology in 1991. She is a Diplomate of the ECVD. Her teaching activitie... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Arena 1

1:25pm

Diagnosing feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus infections
FeLV and FIV are important retrovirus infections of cats worldwide. Understanding the retrovirus status of our feline patients is important for individual health care and to prevent the spread of infection. Deciding which cats to test, which test to use and interpreting the results relies on an understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of FIV and FeLV as well as the performance and availability of different tests. An up-to-date guide to FIV and FeLV testing in practice will be presented. 

Speakers
avatar for Julia Beatty

Julia Beatty

Professor of Feline Medicine, University of Sydney
Professor Jules Beatty graduated from the Royal Veterinary College, London and worked for the RSPCA before completing a PhD and post-doctoral studies on the immune response to FIV and viral oncogenesis at the University of Glasgow. Jules is a Fellow of the Australia and New Zeala... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 5

1:25pm

Vision loss
Sudden vision loss is a distressing clinical presentation for animals and their owners.  In this session Robin will cover the important causes of sudden vision loss that occurs in dogs and cats. 
Small, white, fluffy breeds seem to be most prone to sudden vision loss. In these dogs colored light PLR testing can help you to work out whether these dogs have a retinal or an optic nerve lesion. Robin will also cover ERG - electroretinographic diagnosis of sudden vision loss.  Recently new therapies have been suggested for the treatment of sudden vision loss.
Did you know that most cases of sudden vision loss in cats are caused by high blood pressure? Did you know that you might be able to prevent these cases by regularly examining the fundus?  You should be doing a fundus exam in all cats over the age of 10 years!

Speakers
avatar for Robin Stanley

Robin Stanley

Veterinary Eye Specialist, Animal Eye Care - Melbourne
Robin Stanley BVSc (Hons), FACVSc (Ophthalmology)Robin Stanley graduated with first class honours from the University of Melbourne in 1984. Robin undertook an Ophthalmology Residency from 1987 to 1989 obtaining Membership of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists by exam... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central B/C

1:25pm

Pelvic fractures: When to operate and when to not
This presentation will discuss the evaluation of patients with pelvic trauma and diagnostic methods for pelvic fracture assessment.   It will focus on categorization of pelvic fractures and the indications for surgery or conservative treatment.  The practicalities of conservative management will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Beck

Jason Beck

Specialist Surgeon, Qld Veterinary Specialists
All aspects of small animal soft tissue, orthopaedic and neurosurgery


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Room 6

1:25pm

Managing prostatic disease in dogs
In castrated male dogs, the management of prostatic disease is focused on tumor management and, because many cancers involving the canine prostate are transitional cell carcinomas, medical management can be rewarding.   However, in intact male dogs the full spectrum of prostatic disease must be considered including benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatic cysts, bacterial prostatitis, prostatic abscesses, and neoplasia.  Management of prostatic disease while preserving fertility in stud dogs presents special challenges.  

Speakers
avatar for David Senior

David Senior

Veterinary Consultant
I graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1969 (BVSc) and after one year in a rotating clinical internship, worked in a predominantly dairy/beef practice in Alberta, Canada for four and a half years, then completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at the Univer... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 1:25pm - 2:15pm
Central A

2:20pm

Practical urinalysis: Getting the most out of a seemingly easy test
Urinalysis is one of the tests that is performed most in small animal practice and yet it is rarely done well. This session gives clear tips on how to get the best out of this simple, in-house test. You may find yourself surprised by how many things you should consider when doing this test.

Speakers
avatar for Sue Foster

Sue Foster

Adjunct Associate Professor, Small Animal Medicine, Sue Foster
Small animal medicine, particularly feline medicine, canine hyperadrenocorticism and clinical aspects of clinical pathology testing.


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 7

2:20pm

Fracture repairs: Leaving a smaller footprint
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 9

2:20pm

Adverse food reactions: What has changed?
What do we know about causes? Which tests are useful today and why? How do we manage those patients?

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Arena 1

2:20pm

Bugs and drugs: Understanding rational antibacterial therapy
Antibacterial drugs can be life-saving and are essential tools in the fight against disease. However, their widespread use in humans and animals in the past eight decades has resulted in increasing levels of bacterial resistance which is threatening their efficacy and forcing us to contemplate whether a post-antibiotic world is a real possibility. The focus on using antibacterials wisely and well has never been more important for our own health and that of our pets and patients. In this lecture we will discuss what drugs are effective against which bugs, when and where antibiotics are indicated and very importantly, when they are not, how we can choose appropriate drugs even if the results of culture and susceptibility are not available, and how we reduce the risk that the treatment we prescribe will encourage the development of resistance.  

Speakers
avatar for Jill Maddison

Jill Maddison

Professor of General Practice, The Royal Veterinary College
I am a graduate of the University of Sydney. I completed an internship at the University of Sydney, spent 18 months in full time private practice then completed a residency in small animal medicine at the University of Guelph, Canada. I returned to Australia and completed a PhD e... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 5

2:20pm

Eye problems in older dogs and cats
Our patients are living longer and this now means that we are seeing more degenerative problems in older dogs & cats.  In this presentation Robin from Animal Eye Care in Melbourne will discuss some of these ageing changes that we now see more commonly.
Most old dogs over the age of 10 will develop normal lens ageing - senile nuclear sclerosis.  When does this cause a problem?  Many older dogs also develop corneal lipidosis, and as they age the lipid can calcify and then become fragile.  In these cases deep corneal ulcers can suddenly develop.  This can be avoided by treating these dogs with Optimmune. If you see copious purulent discharge in olcer cats you should be thinking of entropion.  This is now a common problem in older cats.  The surgical management of age related entropion will be covered.  Also older cats are more predisposed to iris pigment changes, these need to be carefully managed and evaluated.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Stanley

Robin Stanley

Veterinary Eye Specialist, Animal Eye Care - Melbourne
Robin Stanley BVSc (Hons), FACVSc (Ophthalmology)Robin Stanley graduated with first class honours from the University of Melbourne in 1984. Robin undertook an Ophthalmology Residency from 1987 to 1989 obtaining Membership of the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists by exam... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central B/C

2:20pm

Pelvic fractures: Surgical management
This will build on the previous presentation.  It will review the indications for pelvic fracture repair and discuss the current concepts and methods in repairing the main categories of surgical fractures.   This will involve a discussion of the surgical approaches and fixation methods for:  sacro-iliac luxations,  ilial shaft fractures and acetabular fractures.   Postoperative management will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Beck

Jason Beck

Specialist Surgeon, Qld Veterinary Specialists
All aspects of small animal soft tissue, orthopaedic and neurosurgery


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 6

2:20pm

Incontinence: From wet to dry
With knowledge of the anatomical and neurological causes of incontinence, diagnosis very often can be achieved through signalement, clinical history, physical (including neurological) examination and direct observation.  Imaging is often necessary and in specific instances, urodynamic studies are helpful.  Many incontinent female dogs can be managed medically.  Incontinence in male dogs is less successful although recent advances in medical management and implanted devices have proven effective.       

Speakers
avatar for David Senior

David Senior

Veterinary Consultant
I graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1969 (BVSc) and after one year in a rotating clinical internship, worked in a predominantly dairy/beef practice in Alberta, Canada for four and a half years, then completed a residency in small animal internal medicine at the Univer... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Central A

3:10pm

Afternoon tea
Monday August 14, 2017 3:10pm - 3:50pm
Exhibition Hall

3:50pm

The diagnostic dilemma of hepatic and pancreatic disease: What do the numbers really mean?
At what level does an increased ALT or ALP unequivocally indicate liver disease? When are bile acids useful and when are they not? What does a positive PLI really mean? Do the results mean the same in dogs and cats – if not, why not?
Liver and pancreatic enzymes and other diagnostic parameters used to assess the hepatobiliary system are commonly measured by veterinarians on unwell patients, prior to anaesthesia or as a general metabolic profile for geriatric animals. Yet deciding exactly what the results mean and what they confirm or rule out can be difficult. During this lecture, I will discuss my top tips for interpreting clin path results related to the liver and pancreas. 

Speakers
avatar for Jill Maddison

Jill Maddison

Professor of General Practice, The Royal Veterinary College
I am a graduate of the University of Sydney. I completed an internship at the University of Sydney, spent 18 months in full time private practice then completed a residency in small animal medicine at the University of Guelph, Canada. I returned to Australia and completed a PhD e... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 7

3:50pm

TMJ: Imaging, pathology and treatment
Speakers
avatar for Loic Legendre

Loic Legendre

Loïc Legendre, DVM, FAVD, Dipl. AVDC, Dipl. EVDCAcademic & ProfessionalBachelor of  Science with Honours from Simon Fraser University, BC, Canada 1980 DVM, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 1984.Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1993.Diplomate American Veterinary Dental College, 1995.President of Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, 1997-1999.Diplomate European Veterinary Dental... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 9

3:50pm

Could this be autoimmune? Diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease
What clinical signs make me think autoimmune? How do I avoid a false diagnosis and which tests are essential?

Speakers
avatar for Ralf Mueller

Ralf Mueller

Professor for Veterinary Dermatology, LMU Munich, Germany
Ralf graduated and completed his doctoral thesis in Munich/Germany, and worked in large and small animal practice before completing a residency in veterinary dermatology at the University of California/Davis. In 1992 he moved to Melbourne to work with his partner and wife Dr. Son... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Arena 1

3:50pm

Infectious upper respiratory disease in the cat
In this session, we will discuss the diagnosis and management of the bacterial and viral causes of URI in cats.   Dr. Lappin is the chairperson of the ISCAID Working Group on treatment of respiratory tract infections in dogs and cats.   He will review the recommended diagnostic plans for this syndrome and will present the treatment guidelines for both acute and chronic disease.   In this session, emphasis will be placed on Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma spp., Chlamydia felis, FHV-1, and FCV.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Lappin

Michael Lappin

Professor, Colorado State University
Dr. Lappin graduated from Oklahoma State University and then completed an internship, internal medicine residency, and PhD program in Parasitology at the University of Georgia. Dr. Lappin is the Kenneth W. Smith Professor in Small Animal Clinical Veterinary Medicine at Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 5

3:50pm

Ophthalmic emergencies
Ophthalmic emergencies are an important part of general practice for a number of reasons: Clients tend to perceive ocular changes as urgent because of the importance humans place on perfect vision; ocular disease can be extremely painful and readily noted by owners; and there is a narrow “window” of opportunity to save sight in some diseases. We will discuss the 3 questions clients can be asked to decide if it is a true emergency and then we will cover the diagnosis and management of a series of common ophthalmic emergencies in dogs and cats such as proptosis, eyelid lacerations, glaucoma, and deep ulcers.

Speakers
avatar for David Maggs

David Maggs

Professor, Comparative Ophthalmology, University of California Davis
David J. Maggs BVSc Hons, Diplomate ACVOProfessor, Comparative OphthalmologyUniversity of California DavisDavis CA 95616Following graduation from the University of Melbourne in 1988, David spent 5 years in mixed practice throughout Australia, England, Scotland, and Wales. He then... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central B/C

3:50pm

Advances in management of upper airway obstruction
The objective of this session is to review the recognition and diagnosis of common causes of upper airway obstruction, notably brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome and laryngeal paralysis using video clips to help illustrate structural and functional laryngeal examination.   Discussion of treatment options will ensue including description of novel approaches to brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome and controversies in outcomes following surgery for laryngeal paralysis.

Speakers
avatar for Catriona M MacPhail

Catriona M MacPhail

Associate Professor; Small Animal Chief Medical Officer, Colorado State University
Catriona M. MacPhail, DVM, PhD | Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons | CSU-VTH Small Animal Chief Medical Officer | Associate Professor, Small Animal Soft Tissue Surgery | ACVS Founding Fellow, Surgical Oncology | Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 6

3:50pm

Pandora syndrome (feline interstitial cystitis): Beyond the bladder and LUT signs
Idiopathic cystitis is the most common lower urinary tract disease resulting in owners of cats seeking attention for inappropriate urinations and urgent voiding (stranguria, hematuria, dysuria, pollakiuria). “Pandora Syndrome” has been recently named to describe the overarching systemic nature of this disorder. FIC involves more than just the bladder, as this is a systemic disease that affects the bladder. Differential diagnoses and their likelihood of occurrence will be shown. A method for diagnosis that is both inclusionary and exclusionary will be developed so that the practitioner will feel confident in establishing a diagnosis of idiopathic cystitis. Similarities of idiopathic cystitis to interstitial cystitis will be drawn.  The first line of treatment using diet and litterbox management will be discussed. Further management of FIC by increasing water turnover, providing stress reduction and environmental enrichment, as well as the uncommon need to prescribe drugs (amitriptyline, analgesia, Feliway®) will be developed.  The concept that drug therapy is not usually needed when multi-modal environmental modification is successfully implemented will be emphasized. Strategies to help treat cats with recurrent lower urinary tract signs will be  developed. Stress reduction and other aspects of environmental modification/enrichment will be detailed. Evaluation of the whole cat will be emphasized so that other organ system problems in addition to the urinary bladder are identified in those with Pandora Syndrome. Tips to allow greater implementation of environmental modification will be given throughout this lecture. 

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Chew

Dennis Chew

Dr. Chew is a 1972 graduate of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He did a one-year internship at South Weymouth Veterinary Associates and a two-year residency in internal medicine and nephrology at the Animal Medical Center in New York City. He beca... Read More →


Monday August 14, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Central A

4:45pm

Closing ceremony
Monday August 14, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Arena 1

5:30pm

Farewell Drinks
Following the closing ceremony, join us for our final farewell drinks in the foyer to say goodbye to colleagues and friends

Sponsors

Monday August 14, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Foyer E
 
Tuesday, August 15
 

8:00am

Dental Symposium
Tuesday August 15, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Room 6

8:15am

Clinical case studies of canine odontogenic cysts
Discussion of three clinical cases of different canine odontogenic cysts, their aetiology, treatment and outcomes

Speakers
avatar for Crystal Loh

Crystal Loh

Senior Veterinary Partner, CAREVETS HAMILTON SOUTH
I graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College in Canada in 2007, following which I completed an internship at the University of Tennessee before immigrating to New Zealand in 2009. From there I developed a special interest in veterinary dentistry and became a member of the Aust... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 8:15am - 9:05am
Room 6

9:10am

Exotic endodontics and prosthodontics
Standard root canals in lion, tiger, bear, red panda, mountain lion, and clouded leopard. Crowns on a clouded leopard. Surgical root canal in a lion.
With complicated crown fractures in large exotic carnivores, endodontically preserving teeth is much preferred as well as being easier for both patient and veterinarian. There are various ways to instrument, obturate, and restore teeth with a standard root canal. This lecture will cover various methods to access, instrument, lubricate, sterilize, and dry the pulp cavities. Instrumenting with hand files and Light Speed rotary instruments will be shown on canine teeth and incisors. Paper points can be attached to 60mm Hedstrom files and/or pipe cleaners can be used to dry the pup cavities. Obturation with AH Plus and gutta percha, GuttaFlo 2 and gutta percha are common methods. Intermediate restoration with a glass ionomer followed with a flowable composite to complete the restoration. Standard root canals will be shown in a lion, mountain lion, red panda, and tiger.
With some of these patients the fractures are chronic and the apex has been destroyed or they are immature with an open apex, therefore standard and surgical root canal will be required to preserve a tooth. These procedures will be shown on a young male lion with a mandibular canine tooth fracture. The diseased apex was removed, the periapical region debrided, and the apex was sealed with MTA.
If an animal continues to damage its teeth in its living enclosure metal crowns can be placed on vital or endodontically treated teeth. A clouded leopard with complicated crown/ crown root fractures of all four canine teeth has an extraction, three standard root canals, and two base metal crowns.

Speakers
avatar for Barron Hall

Barron Hall

Owner, Animal Dental Clinic
Dr. Barron Hall is from Columbus, OH. He is a 1993 Graduate of The Ohio State University - College of Veterinary Medicine. He is a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College and owns Animal Dental Clinic in Vienna, VA. Dr. Hall is a long time supporter of the Peter Emily... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 9:10am - 10:00am
Room 6

10:00am

Morning Tea
Tuesday August 15, 2017 10:00am - 10:40am
Exhibition Hall

10:40am

Feline chronic gingivostomatitis: What we know and what we can do about it
This presentation will include a discussion of potential causes, treatment options, and current research on feline chronic gingivostomatitis.

Speakers
avatar for Milinda Lommer

Milinda Lommer

Dr. Milinda Lommer earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree with Phi Zeta honors from U.C. Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine in 1995.  Following a 1-year internship in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Dr. Lommer returned to U.C. Davis, where she became the first veterinarian to complete the three-year residency program in Dentistry... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 10:40am - 11:30am
Room 6

11:35am

Paedodontics: Juvenile dentistry for general practice.
It is common for young animals to be presented to the veterinary clinic in their first year of life for general health checks. Assessment of the oral cavity during these visits is important as it allows any oral pathology to be identified and treated early, minimising the likelihood of permanent disease or discomfort. General practitioners should feel comfortable in recognising normal deciduous dentition and the developmental changes that occur in the first year of life.
Common juvenile dental conditions include malocclusion, eruption failure, crown fractures, and persistent deciduous teeth.  Approach to treatment is similar to adult dentistry but greater care and attention to detail is required. Radiography is critical to assessment and successful treatment. Juvenile dentistry is a part of good general practice. 
 

Speakers
avatar for Tara Cashman

Tara Cashman

PARTNER, President AVDS
Tara Cashman graduated from Sydney Uni in 1995 and worked in mixed practice for 2 years before returning to complete a mixed practice internship in 1998. After a brief working holiday to the UK she returned to Australia and became a partner in a NSW practice where she still works... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 11:35am - 12:25pm
Room 6

12:25pm

Lunch
Tuesday August 15, 2017 12:25pm - 1:25pm
Exhibition Hall

1:25pm

Feline oral swellings and growths
Swellings and growths of the oral cavity are common in feline patients. Etiologies of oral swellings and masses will be presented and the process in the oral examination of patients, awake and anesthetized and the diagnostic tools available to help characterize lesions will be discussed. 

Speakers
avatar for Angelica Bebel

Angelica Bebel

DVM, Resident, West Coast Veterinary Dental Services
Born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, Dr. Angelica Bebel began her veterinary career as a Registered Animal Health Technician in 2004. In 2014, she graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon, Canada and returned to Vancouver, where she worke... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 1:25pm - 1:50pm
Room 6

1:50pm

Case report: An odontogenic mass in a 10 year old feline patient
Odontogenic cysts are uncommon in dogs and cats. This presentation discusses the incidental finding of a cyst-like structure in the right caudal maxilla of a 10 year old, male, domestic shorthair feline patient and outlines the diagnostic workup and treatment plan undertaken for this patient. 

Speakers
avatar for Angelica Bebel

Angelica Bebel

DVM, Resident, West Coast Veterinary Dental Services
Born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, Dr. Angelica Bebel began her veterinary career as a Registered Animal Health Technician in 2004. In 2014, she graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in Saskatoon, Canada and returned to Vancouver, where she worke... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 1:50pm - 2:40pm
Room 6

2:20pm

Senior dental care: They’re not too old!
Senior pets often have extensive dental problems, and with appropriate anesthetic protocols and patient management, you can provide excellent dental care.
While many of the problems encountered may be found throughout a pet's life (periodontal disease, broken teeth, tooth resorptions), some conditions are found more frequently in older pets (neoplasia).  The need for care is sometimes overlooked until it is quite severe, and potentially having an influence on systemic health.  Sometimes the delay in getting appropriate care may stem from concerns of placing a mature, senior or geriatric pet under general anaesthesia for complete therapy.
This lecture will cover some of the basic tenets of ageing and dental care in dogs and cats, discussing specific areas of oral and dental disease that are seen more commonly in older pets.  Specific concerns of anaesthetic risks due to health concerns will also be addressed, as well as standards of care for monitoring and patient care.  With good planning and risk management, many senior patients can greatly benefit from optimal oral care to improve their quality of life.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Lobprise

Heidi Lobprise

Main Street Veterinary Dental Clinic
Dr. Heidi Lobprise, Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College, graduated from Texas A & M University with her DVM in 1983. She worked in private practice in the Dallas area for nearly 20 years, and completed a residency in veterinary dentistry with the guidance of Dr... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 2:20pm - 3:10pm
Room 6

3:10pm

Afternoon tea
Tuesday August 15, 2017 3:10pm - 3:50pm
Exhibition Hall

3:50pm

Practical periodontal therapy
How to treat a variety of periodontal disease lesions in your practice for your patient’s optimal dental health.
This lecture will cover the aspects of the extent and type of attachment loss on, and the relative importance of, the tooth.  Strategic teeth such as canines and carnassial teeth often deserve special consideration while less strategic teeth however, particularly those adjacent to the larger ones, may be selected for extraction to allow better access to their neighbour for more effective treatment.  A treatment algorithm will help determine an appropriate treatment, from non-surgical methods to surgical periodontal therapy with flap design, implementation and closure.  Concepts of repair, regeneration (periodontal; guided tissue), new attachment and re-attachment will be discussed, as well as the phases of periodontal therapy.
The discussion will end with the issue of whether certain procedures are appropriate for individual patients.  In comparison to humans, a shorter lifespan and the emphasis of function over aesthetics should make us questions if a procedure that might be possible to perform would be best for our patients.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Lobprise

Heidi Lobprise

Main Street Veterinary Dental Clinic
Dr. Heidi Lobprise, Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College, graduated from Texas A & M University with her DVM in 1983. She worked in private practice in the Dallas area for nearly 20 years, and completed a residency in veterinary dentistry with the guidance of Dr... Read More →


Tuesday August 15, 2017 3:50pm - 4:40pm
Room 6

4:45pm

Ask a guru-panel discussion
Tuesday August 15, 2017 4:45pm - 5:35pm
Room 6